Business is booming.

Young Americans are using more drugs than ever before!

Young Americans are taking more drugs than ever before, an official report found Monday, with the use of marijuana and hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD, MDMA and ‘magic mushrooms’ reaching record highs.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) annual survey found that four in 10 young people under the age of 30 used cannabis last year, a quarter more than a decade ago. The number of hallucinogens also reached an all-time high of one in 12, doubling from five years ago.

Alcohol remained the most popular substance among young people: eight in ten drank it, but three in ten binge drinking returned to pre-pandemic levels, while high-intensity drinking – with more than 10 alcoholic drinks per night – rose. to a record 13 percent.

Marijuana use is on the rise in states where it has been legalized for recreational smoking, such as California, New York and Massachusetts. These states are also seeing a “potential explosion” in underage use of the drug as it appears on store shelves.

Health experts say taking cannabis poses a ‘real risk’ to brain development – especially in young adults – leading to problems with memory and attention span. Ordinary users may also be more likely to experience relationship problems, educational difficulties, and lower career performance.

The chart above shows the percentage of young Americans who said they were using marijuana at least once a year by 2021.  It shows that the level is now at a record high

The chart above shows the percentage of young Americans who said they were using marijuana at least once a year by 2021. It shows that the level is now at a record high

The chart above shows the percentage of Americans surveyed who said they had ingested at least one hallucinogen, such as LSD or MDMA, by 2021.  It shows that usage has been increasing lately.

The chart above shows the percentage of Americans surveyed who said they had ingested at least one hallucinogen, such as LSD or MDMA, by 2021.  It shows that usage has been increasing lately.

The chart above shows the percentage of Americans surveyed who said they had ingested at least one hallucinogen, such as LSD or MDMA, by 2021. It shows that usage has been increasing lately.

This graph shows alcohol consumption over the year.  84 percent of those surveyed said they would have had a drink in 2021

This graph shows alcohol consumption over the year.  84 percent of those surveyed said they would have had a drink in 2021

This graph shows alcohol consumption over the year. 84 percent of those surveyed said they would have had a drink in 2021

Marijuana use is on the rise in states where it has been legalized for recreational smoking, such as California, New York and Massachusetts.

Marijuana use is on the rise in states where it has been legalized for recreational smoking, such as California, New York and Massachusetts.

1661247420 68 Young Americans are using more drugs than ever before

1661247420 68 Young Americans are using more drugs than ever before

Marijuana use is on the rise in states where it has been legalized for recreational smoking, such as California, New York and Massachusetts. dr. Yuyan Shi, a health policy analyst at the University of California, San Diego, who leads research into cannabis use, complained earlier this year about the “adverse mental health effects” it had on young people.

More than 5,000 young people aged 19 to 30 were surveyed for the NIDA and University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research led study between April and October of this year.

It found that 43 percent of respondents said they had used marijuana within the year, while 29 percent used it every month and 11 percent said they used it every day — defined as at least 20 times a month.

The number of users per day had doubled compared to a decade ago, when only six percent said they used it that often.

Americans can’t kick Covid drinking habit, study shows

The habit of drinking at home Americans picked up during the Covid-19 pandemic continues — and it will lead to hundreds of thousands more hospital visits and multi-billion dollar medical bills, research revealed earlier this month.

A study found that home drinking “spiked” in 2020 and remained strong in 2021. Many Americans will “keep the party at home,” even as Covid-19 restrictions fade and bars and eateries get busier, it said.

Another found that widespread drinking at home will take a huge toll. Over five years, this means 295,000 additional hospital visits due to alcohol and $5.4 billion more in health care costs.

Carolina Barbosa, a health economist at RTI, a North Carolina-based research institute, warned that the increase in drinking during the pandemic is likely to continue and carry a “significant health and economic burden” in the US.

The study did not look at how marijuana was consumed, whether through smoking or through edibles, or for medicinal or recreational purposes. It also did not collect data on the amount of cannabis consumed.

For hallucinogens, eight percent said they had used them in the past year in 2021, double the three percent who gave the same answer in 2011.

People were most likely to say they used LSD (4.2 percent), followed by MDMA (2 percent), although their use had declined compared to last year.

The survey, called the Monitoring the Future panel study, has been running since 1988.

dr. Megan Patrick, who led the study, said it allowed them to assess “the effects of “natural experiments” like the pandemic” on drug use.

“We can examine how and why drugs are used and uncover critical areas to determine where research should go and to inform public health interventions,” she added.

According to estimates, about 48.2 million people take marijuana every year, a figure that continues to rise as it is legalized in more and more states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn that marijuana can impair brain development and increase the risk of lung and heart problems. A Danish study published today found that people who use marijuana for medicinal reasons are 74 percent more likely to have heart problems than those who don’t.

Other health authorities warned that marijuana poses a “real risk” to mental development and can lead to a permanent loss of IQ if used regularly.

They add that it can also pose a risk to pregnant or breastfeeding women.

The report also found that cigarette use declined in 2021 compared to previous years, to 18 percent compared to 23 percent five years ago. But as these fell, vaping rose from six to 16 percent over the same period.

Data from the alcohol use survey found that about 82 percent of 19 to 30-year-olds drank at least once a year by 2021.

About 32 percent said they binge drinking — more than five drinks in a row — while 13 percent admitted to heavy drinking. This was the highest ever and an increase of 11 percent five years ago.

It comes amid growing concerns that it is already becoming a problematic habit among young adults in the 19 states where cannabis has been legalized.

A DailyMail.com analysis of research focused on California, Massachusetts, Nevada and other states that have legalized recreational marijuana showed experts warning of a “potential explosion” of underage use — and more young people are using it than in states where it’s illegal. is.

They were alarmed by the weak oversight of a $30 billion company and warned of a free-for-all market selling super-potent cannabis products in cartoon-covered packaging that attracts young people, even if tobacco and alcohol companies aren’t allowed to target young people.

Data from the 19 states that have allowed recreational marijuana in the past decade, as well as the 38 states that allow medical use, indicate that teens and young adults there are more likely to use stronger products.

Not every teen who eats a pot gummy sees their life unravel. But they are more prone to addiction and dependence than adults, and greater availability and use means more cases of anxiety, depression, psychosis and even suicide.

dr. Yuyan Shi, a health policy analyst at the University of California, San Diego, who leads research into cannabis use, complained earlier this year about the “adverse mental health effects” it had on young people. She warned that it can also hinder breathing and lead to heart disease.

But cigarette use in all age groups has continued to decline.  This chart shows it fell to 18.6 percent last year, a record low among 19 to 30 year olds.  Among 35- to 50-year-olds, it also fell to a record low of 14.5 percent

But cigarette use in all age groups has continued to decline.  This chart shows it fell to 18.6 percent last year, a record low among 19 to 30 year olds.  Among 35- to 50-year-olds, it also fell to a record low of 14.5 percent

But cigarette use in all age groups has continued to decline. This chart shows it fell to 18.6 percent last year, a record low among 19 to 30 year olds. Among 35- to 50-year-olds, it also fell to a record low of 14.5 percent

Binge drinking — or drinking more than five drinks in a row — bounced back to pre-pandemic levels last year and 19 to 30-year-olds, NIDA survey suggests

Binge drinking — or drinking more than five drinks in a row — bounced back to pre-pandemic levels last year and 19 to 30-year-olds, NIDA survey suggests

Binge drinking — or drinking more than five drinks in a row — bounced back to pre-pandemic levels last year and 19 to 30-year-olds, NIDA survey suggests

The share of young people who drink intensively - more than 10 glasses in a row - also increased again

The share of young people who drink intensively - more than 10 glasses in a row - also increased again

The share of young people who drink intensively – more than 10 glasses in a row – also increased again

In November, voters in Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota, and Oklahoma will decide whether to liberalize their own cannabis laws — and will let the pot industry windfalls flow into the state coffers.

“Cannabis use is more common among youth and adults in states where cannabis use is legal for recreational use,” Renee Goodwin, who leads the Columbia University study, told DailyMail.com.

“Legalization has moved from a matter of social justice to the other extreme of commercialization of large companies without the same restrictions that tobacco and alcohol now have to follow.”

DailyMail.com also spoke to parents in weed-allowing states who said their children were becoming addicted to teen-friendly cannabis products, had physical and mental health problems, and were messing up their education.

One of them, Mary Maas, 57, voted to legalize recreational cannabis in Washington in 2012, but saw her son, Adam, fall into a devastating addiction to super-potent pot products, aside from the “Woodstock weed” she remembers from the 60’s.

.