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Yorkshire Shepherdess Amanda Owen says she now allows hundreds of people to visit Ravenseat farm every day

Amanda Owen of our Yorkshire Farm has been candid about her experience of fame, saying she found it ‘invasive’.

The mother of nine, 47, who takes care of a thousand sheep and other animals at the Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive, 67, and their offspring, said the Sunday Times Magazine she struggles with people asking for her photo when she’s out and about.

She revealed that hundreds of people come to her farm every day and use the cafe she and Clive have opened there – adding that she understands what makes Our Yorkshire Farm, which airs on Channel 5 on Tuesdays, so popular that the farm is real .

Hundreds pass by every day. Sometimes it can be more exhausting to smile than to s***,’ she said.

Yorkshire Shepherdess, Amanda Owen, 47, pictured, has revealed she finds fame invasive but admits she takes advantage of it

Yorkshire Shepherdess, Amanda Owen, 47, pictured, has revealed she finds fame invasive but admits she takes advantage of it

Amanda runs the Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive.  She says hundreds of curious fans come to visit, hoping to catch a glimpse of her or her children

Amanda runs the Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive.  She says hundreds of curious fans come to visit, hoping to catch a glimpse of her or her children

Amanda runs the Ravenseat farm with her husband Clive. She says hundreds of curious fans come to visit, hoping to catch a glimpse of her or her children

“There’s a time when I’d like to close the door and say, ‘This is my life, this is my time.’ And that’s quite difficult,” she added.

She admitted that Clive and her take advantage of the visitors who come to their farm to run the cafe they opened on site.

But she added that she found it difficult that she now has people to reply to and that sometimes people take pictures of her or record her while she is working on her farm.

“Of course it’s invasive. People know where we live and they can get there — but that’s the unique selling point, that the farm is real,” she said.

Amanda said it's a vicious circle to write about your life because you never run out of material

Amanda said it's a vicious circle to write about your life because you never run out of material

Amanda said it’s a vicious circle to write about your life because you never run out of material

Going strong: Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after arriving at his farm as a 21-year-old shepherdess in training

Going strong: Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after arriving at his farm as a 21-year-old shepherdess in training

Going strong: Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after arriving at his farm as a 21-year-old shepherdess in training

Amanda, who has written several books on farm life — the latest on seasonal life published this Thursday — said it’s a “vicious cycle” and she couldn’t stop writing about it because the material is there.

She added that her nine children, ages 20 to five, have not been tarnished by fame and have not received any negative comments.

She said the show, books and the publicity surrounding a farm were all ways to fund the future of her nine children. She added that she had never used childcare as it would have been more stressful than convenient for her.

She added that she benefited from a “waterfall effect” where the oldest children took care of the younger ones as they grew up.

Following in Mom's Footsteps: Clemmie (Llinks photo) rehomes a lost chick and the girls find a brood of young kestrels nesting in one of their traditional stone haylofts in one of the episodes

Following in Mom's Footsteps: Clemmie (Llinks photo) rehomes a lost chick and the girls find a brood of young kestrels nesting in one of their traditional stone haylofts in one of the episodes

Following in Mom’s Footsteps: Clemmie (Llinks photo) rehomes a lost chick and the girls find a brood of young kestrels nesting in one of their traditional stone haylofts in one of the episodes

Amanda has not been afraid to speak out on social media in the past.

She recently slammed a troll who said her kids “can’t handle it in the real world” after an unconventional upbringing on the “quaint” farm.

The mother of nine, 46, lives with her brood and husband Clive on a 2,000-acre Ravenseat farm in the Yorkshire Dales after moving to the country in 1996 to train as a shepherdess.

Amanda has gained a huge following thanks to the popularity of the Channel 5 show, Our Yorkshire Farm. However, she has now hit back at a troll who criticized her for the “unconventional” way she chose to raise her offspring.

Talk about Sophie Ellis Bextor’s podcastshe noted: ‘She [my children] get really good life lessons that they can translate and take with them to any other life wherever that should be – be it in the countryside or in the city.

‘Because people say’ [to me]”Oh, they don’t grow up in the real world, they’ll never handle real life.”‘

Full house!  The writer, 46, and her husband Clive, 67, share Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine, five and four.  old Nancy

Full house!  The writer, 46, and her husband Clive, 67, share Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine, five and four.  old Nancy

Full house! The writer, 46, and her husband Clive, 67, share Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine, five and four. old Nancy

“But they’re actually learning lessons. That makes them really good to be people who are hands-on and people who have a certain amount of common sense and can do things.”

Amanda went on to say that one of her nine children even learned to ride a bike without parental help, noting that this is an indication of their independence.

The Shepherdess of Yorkshire previously appeared on poet Simon Armitage’s BBC Radio 4 podcast, where she shared how she will leave it to her children to decide if they want to become shepherds and stay on the family farm.

“I don’t look that far ahead,” she explained. “I tell the kids they can be whatever they want to be and go wherever they want.

“Of course they go through stages where they get more excited about the countryside, as they get older into their teens, of course they want to leave.

Free Spirits!  The doting parent said she taught her kids independence (Owen is pictured with some of her kids on the Moors)

Free Spirits!  The doting parent said she taught her kids independence (Owen is pictured with some of her kids on the Moors)

Free Spirits! The doting parent said she taught her kids independence (Owen is pictured with some of her kids on the Moors)

“Raven (her eldest child) when she went to York she went to the bright lights, couldn’t wait to go to a place where her phone worked and she could order a takeaway without being cold and sticking to the paper paste – it’s all brilliant.

“But you know I’ll get text messages in a month or two asking how to make Yorkshire pudding tins from bean tins and how to make a loaf of bread on a radiator if you don’t have an open fire. So it taught you the kind of life you live in the countryside.”

In April, the writer blamed parents for the current “snowflake” generation of kids who can’t take care of themselves.

The shepherd suggested that today’s youth had “no sense of independence” or work ethic.

“The snowflake generation, they can’t do anything,” Amanda told the… Radio Times. “They don’t know anything about taking care of themselves, or a work ethic, that’s all gone out the window. It’s our fault as parents.

In April, the shepherd (pictured) blamed parents for the current 'snowflake' generation of children who cannot fend for themselves

In April, the shepherd (pictured) blamed parents for the current 'snowflake' generation of children who cannot fend for themselves

In April, the shepherd (pictured) blamed parents for the current ‘snowflake’ generation of children who cannot fend for themselves

“If you put your child on a pedestal, with no sense of independence, and think you have to entertain him all the time, what can you expect?

“I refuse to swaddle children because I want them to continue, do well and be themselves, whatever that is. I feel like it’s their life and I’m just preparing them.

“What we do on the farm is hopefully preparing for the big world. The lessons they get here will serve them well.’

Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after arriving at his farm as a 21-year-old shepherdess in training.

Amanda grew up in a traditional three bedroom house with her parents and a sibling in the large market town of Huddersfield.

At six feet tall, the blonde was encouraged to follow the same career path as her model mother, but hated the clothes and makeup she had to wear.

She left her comfortable city life to work on farms across the country, but when she knocked on the door of Ravenseat Farm, she found her calling.

Many of her kids help out on the farm when they’re not at school — or commute, as the journey takes an hour and a half each way.

“For a large family to work, they all have to draw the line. It’s not about child labor – it’s about working together,” Amanda told the Daily Mail in a 2018 article.

With the nearest shop so far away – and the risk in the winter that they could be snowed in for weeks – the TV star buys food in bulk and manages to feed her large family for just £130 a week.

Their water is free, channeled from the stream on the moor, and they heat the house and water with a blazing fire, which burns every day, regardless of the weather.

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