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William Hanson reveals the new rules of etiquette for pandemic life

Etiquette expert William Hanson revealed his do’s and don’ts for pandemic living this winter at a performance at Lorraine today.

As fears continue to grow around the approaching winter wave, expert William shared his advice with ITV viewers, explaining that people need to be ‘proactive’ with their limits during the pandemic.

Speaking to presenter Christine Lampard, he said: “If you’re one of those people who doesn’t want to cuddle, be proactive. Stop a few steps before entering such an intimate zone and give them a hand on the heart, a namaste, a nice wave.’

It comes as Rishi Sunak insisted there was no need to move to Plan B to reduce Covid cases – after health chiefs discussed whether an ‘immediate rollout’ of tougher measures was needed to stem a rise of the number of cases.

Etiquette expert William Hanson revealed his do's and don'ts for pandemic living this winter at a performance at Lorraine today

Etiquette expert William Hanson revealed his do’s and don’ts for pandemic living this winter at a performance at Lorraine today

Discussing the crisis on today’s program, William said: “Everyone will have different attitudes and levels of comfort and while we are in this limbo where some people have absolutely no problem with cuddling and want it, and others won’t.” we ‘must be proactive.’

“If necessary, if you’re not sure if they like a hug, you can ask them, ‘Would you like a hug?’ You can ask them, talk to them.

“If they’re not comfortable, they can say, ‘I’m fine, thank you, but so nice to see you.’

“You can be exuberant with your language, your non-verbal communication before you go into such an awkward hug.”

Etiquette expert has advised commuters to 'move carriages' if they feel uncomfortably close to someone who is coughing

Etiquette expert has advised commuters to 'move carriages' if they feel uncomfortably close to someone who is coughing

Etiquette expert has advised commuters to ‘move carriages’ if they feel uncomfortably close to someone who is coughing

Christine called the talks “time-consuming,” but William added, “If it’s there to protect us, it’s probably for the better.”

Is plan B on the way? Health leaders gauge support for ‘immediate rollout’ of work-from-home and Covid passports, ‘secret document’ shows – but Rishi insists it’s not needed ‘at the moment’ as Covid cases FALL 11% in week

Rishi Sunak insisted there was no need to move to Plan B to reduce Covid cases today – after health chiefs discussed whether an ‘immediate rollout’ of tougher measures was needed to stem an increase in cases to counteract.

The chancellor insisted that the data shows that bringing back working from home and introducing mandatory Covid passports was not yet necessary.

His comments on the BBC’s Andrew Marr program came after it was reported that the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) reached out to local authorities on Friday to ask for their support for the ‘immediate roll-out of the Winter Plan – Plan B’.

An ‘official-sensitive’ document seen by the Observer asked leaders and chief executives of councils across England to be submitted to the Cabinet Office before that end of the day.

But Mr Sunak said today: “The data does not suggest that we should move to Plan B immediately.”

However, a leading government scientist said that “some sort of plan B” was needed immediately.

Professor Adam Finn, who is a member of the Joint Vaccination and Immunization Committee (JCVI), said hospital admissions and deaths from Covid-19 are on the rise, warning against complacency in what he believes is a ‘deteriorating’ situation.

The presenter went on to ask how to “get out of the situation” where someone has to cough near you while commuting.

William explained, “It’s either going to be uncomfortable, or I’ll just sit there and be tense and afraid I’m going to inhale those particles.

“If you can, my suggestion is to wait until the next stop and pretend to get off, go to the doors and hopefully that person won’t think you’re getting off because they’re coughing.

“Go to the next carriage at the next stop.”

He continued: “It might be a little extreme, but… I’d rather protect myself than make them feel uncomfortable. Since they may have a sore throat in the back of their throat, it could be completely normal.

William added: ‘It’s not always the best way to be confrontational and direct. Manners are about other people, other people have feelings just as much as we do.’

It comes as it turned out that the UK’s Covid-19 infections have fallen by 11 per cent in a week, as fears around the impending winter wave continue to grow.

Health ministry bosses reported a further 39,962 cases today, down from the 45,140 reported last Sunday.

However, the number of people dying from the virus has risen, with 72 deaths reported today compared to 57 on Oct. 17 – a 26 percent increase.

The government’s figures come as the vaccine effort across Britain continues, with a total of 45,542,207 now receiving both doses of the Covid shot.

The chancellor has insisted that the data shows that bringing back working from home and introducing mandatory Covid passports was not yet necessary.

His comments on the BBC’s Andrew Marr program came after it was reported that the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) reached out to local authorities on Friday to ask for their support for the ‘immediate roll-out of the Winter Plan – Plan B’.

An ‘official-sensitive’ document seen by the Observer asked leaders and chief executives of councils across England to be submitted to the Cabinet Office before that end of the day.

But Mr Sunak said yesterday: “The data does not suggest that we should move to Plan B immediately.”

Yesterday, a government scientific adviser said he was “very fearful” that there will be another “lockdown Christmas”.

William suggested that those who are uncomfortable with cuddling should “don’t enter a friend’s intimate zone” and offer a “namaste” instead

Professor Peter Openshaw, member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) and SAGE subgroup CO-CIN, said the number of cases and death rates are currently “unacceptable”.

But SAGE scientists insisted it was ‘highly unlikely’ that the NHS would be flooded by the virus even without restrictions this winter.

Modeling by the group for England predicted that the combination of vaccine-derived immunity and natural protection would be enough to keep hospital rates below levels seen during the second wave.

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