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Wife Lists the Weird Things Aussies Do

Amused Aussie lists the normal things she does that make her seem ‘weird’ to foreigners – from saying ‘I think’ all the time to eating fairy bread and chicken salt

  • A young Australian has gone through a list of things foreigners don’t ‘get’
  • Australians’ refusal to use an electronic dryer regularly ‘confuses’ many visitors
  • Some eating habits – like fairy bread and chicken salt are also labeled as ‘strange’


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An Australian woman has made a list of the things Australians say and do that make them seem ‘weird’ to people from other countries.

They include having on and off switches on electrical outlets, using PayWave, ending sentences with “but” and refusing to use the tumble dryer on a sunny day.

Australian social media personality Tannar has gone through the things that people from other countries can’t turn their heads around.

Australian social media personality Tannar went through the things that people from other countries can't turn their heads around - including on/off switches

Australian social media personality Tannar went through the things that people from other countries can’t turn their heads around – including on/off switches

Most other countries have switchless outlets, so the switches leave them messed up

Most other countries have switchless outlets, so the switches leave them messed up

Most other countries have switchless outlets, so the switches leave them messed up

crazy Australian things that make us weird!? Like my page for more videos

Posted by Tannar on Tuesday, October 19, 2021

The six-minute video begins with a photo of a frozen Coke and Tannar explaining that they don’t exist anywhere else.

Frozen drinks are known elsewhere as slushies and usually don’t have a cola flavor.

The next thing the young woman turned to is PayWave – something not widely used anywhere else.

She said the ease of tapping is a no-brainer and asked why people would ever want to sign anything.

She also noted that people in Australia tend to dry their clothes in the sun, on lines set up in their yard or lounge area — a foreign concept to many, especially Americans.

She called the tumble dryer a prohibited device that should only be used in an emergency.

What ‘normal’ things do Australians do that confuse everyone?

Eat fairy bread

Eat spaghetti on toast

Have chicken salt on chips

Drink frozen cola

Wear helmets on bicycles

Call slides in parks ‘slippery dips’

Survive with slow WiFi

Have double flush toilets

Put switches on sockets

Have pedestrian crossings with sound

End sentences with ‘but’

Say “calculate” often

Refuse to use dryers when it’s sunny

Use PayWave

Mispronouncing Brand Names Like Adidas

Source: Tannar

She also mentioned fairy bread and chicken salt in her story, two Aussie favorites that can’t be found anywhere else in the world.

One man said he tried fairy bread and explained to his American followers that it’s buttered bread with sprinkles, and “understands why it’s so important.”

“Why are people so confused about this, it’s wonderful,” she said.

But she said she could somewhat understand the food-related confusion.

The next topic, sockets with switches, she can’t fathom.

Most countries don’t have switches on the sockets – the young woman will be amazed.

Chicken salt, frozen cola, fairy bread and spaghetti on toast turned out to confuse people too

Chicken salt, frozen cola, fairy bread and spaghetti on toast turned out to confuse people too

Chicken salt, frozen cola, fairy bread and spaghetti on toast turned out to confuse people too

Australians also wear a helmet every time they cycle – a safety measure found nowhere else in the world.

The next, surprising thing on the list that confuses people is zebra crossings.

‘In Australia zebra crossings make noise,’ noted one foreigner.

In fact, it’s so unusual that Billie Eilish used them in her song “Bad Guy.”

Tannar explained to her audience that the sound was such that visually impaired people could safely cross the road and was shocked that the feature was not widespread.

Poor Wi-Fi, double flush toilets, and sentences ending with “but” or using the word “reckon” too often were other issues foreigners pointed out.

She looked at a note that listed common terminology for a playground staple.

“I just found out Australians call slides slippery dips, you guys are weird,” the message read.

Tannar immediately hit back and said “slippery dip” was clearly a better term.

The way in which Australians pronounce foreign brands, such as Adidas, is also ‘weird’ according to foreigners.

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