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UVF is playing the part in the Belfast gangs exhibition

UVF sources have falsely claimed that there is a split in the organization related to a historic event in East Belfast.

ruble-related memorabilia, including deactivated weapons and memories from the Maze Prison, were exhibited at the Raven Club yesterday. There was also a tribute to the sectarian serial killer and double agent Robin ‘The Jackal’ Jackson, who was involved in terrorist attacks such as the Miami Showband massacre.

The display – heralded as a history of the modern UVF and Red Hand Commando – was at the center of an earlier row of reports that senior figures in the gang had not been invited.

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Rifles and memorabilia from the UVF and Red Hand commands that were part of the exhibition of loyalist artifacts during the history of the conflict in Northern Ireland at the Raven Social Club in East Belfast

It followed criticism from loyalist historian William McCaughey who accused the gang of “torturing the Protestant people.” This was due to the murder of UVF member Ian Ogle by members of the UVF in East Belfast.

Friends of the murdered father of two organized the Raven Club event yesterday that gave a remarkable insight into the inner workings of the terror gang.

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Photographs and posters that were part of the exhibition of Loyalist artifacts during the history of the conflict in Northern Ireland at the Raven Social Club in East Belfast.

In a statement, the organizers said, “For a conflict that has been the subject of so much writing, the fact remains that some key elements are misunderstood or overlooked.

“Ulster loyalism is an example of this. We are committed to working with others to change this.

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Rifles and memorabilia from the UVF and Red Hand commandos that were part of the exhibition of loyalist artifacts during the history of the conflict in Northern Ireland at the Raven Social Club in East Belfast.

“It is a reality that for those within the loyalist community who have played an active role in the conflict, their families and their supporters, there are many stories to tell, from the formation of the UVF in 1912 to its central role in the conflict , which ended with the 1994 ceasefire of the Combined Loyalist Military Command. ”

The organizers added, “There is an emerging group of people willing to explain the loyalist story. This exhibition is one such opportunity to do that.”

Belfast Telegraph