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Tonnes of rock dumped at Cronulla Beach Sydney that after it almost vanished in erosion by storms

Tons of rock have been dumped on a popular Sydney beach after it nearly disappeared when damaging storms ravaged the coastline.

Up to 5,000 tons of sandstone boulders will be used as a short-term solution to stop the damage caused by coastal erosion at Cronulla Beach, in southern Sydney.

Giant waves hit the coast in mid-July and eroded the sandbar, forcing the beach to be closed and the lifeguard tower moved.

A large crane has been used to dump the sandstone after thousands of cubic yards of sand were swept off the Bate Bay foreshore.

Tons of rock have been dumped on a popular Sydney beach after it nearly disappeared when damaging storms ravaged the coastline in July (photo, Cronulla Beach)

Tons of rock have been dumped on a popular Sydney beach after it nearly disappeared when damaging storms ravaged the coastline in July (photo, Cronulla Beach)

A large crane has been used to dump the sandstone after thousands of cubic meters of sand were swept off the foreshore of Bate Bay (pictured)

A large crane has been used to dump the sandstone after thousands of cubic meters of sand were swept off the foreshore of Bate Bay (pictured)

A large crane has been used to dump the sandstone after thousands of cubic meters of sand were swept off the foreshore of Bate Bay (pictured)

‘Sutherland Shire Council is currently carrying out repairs to the seawall of the beach due to significant erosion,’ read a sign on the beach.

The council’s ‘Bate Bay Coastal Management Program’ outlines a long-term strategy to protect local beaches from coastal erosion.

The council will seek grants for future projects, including an upgrade of the esplanade north of Cronulla Beach and a buried sea wall.

Sea walls are hard structures that help prevent further erosion of the coastline by holding in sand or preventing it from sliding.

A spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia that the Sutherland Shire Council has been working diligently in recent weeks to tackle the significant sand erosion.

They said damage had occurred on many of Sydney’s most popular beaches, caused by major storms and sustained heavy swells.

“The installation of about 7,000 tons of rock to form a protective wall along some of our riskiest coastlines has proven to be an effective short-term measure to prevent further coastal erosion,” they said.

Up to 5,000 tons of sandstone boulders will be used as a short-term solution to the damage caused by coastal erosion (pictured) at Cronulla Beach, in southern Sydney

Up to 5,000 tons of sandstone boulders will be used as a short-term solution to the damage caused by coastal erosion (pictured) at Cronulla Beach, in southern Sydney

Up to 5,000 tons of sandstone boulders will be used as a short-term solution to the damage caused by coastal erosion (pictured) at Cronulla Beach, in southern Sydney

'Sutherland Shire Council is currently carrying out repairs to the seawall of the beach due to significant erosion,' reads a sign on the beach.

'Sutherland Shire Council is currently carrying out repairs to the seawall of the beach due to significant erosion,' reads a sign on the beach.

‘Sutherland Shire Council is currently carrying out repairs to the seawall of the beach due to significant erosion,’ reads a sign on the beach.

Work also continues to restore safe access to beaches along the numerous access paths maintained by the Council.

“The sand lost from our beaches will naturally return over time, with some areas of our beaches having already seen about 1.5 meters of sand returned since the most recent coastal erosion event.”

The spokesperson assured locals that access to the popular beach will gradually return in the coming weeks.

“The Council is also working with the Government of NSW to carry out a project that will see approximately 60,000 cubic meters of sand dredged from the main shipping channels of the Port Hacking River, following similarly successful dredging operations in 2012 and 2007,” they said. .

The dredged sand will be dumped off the coast of Cronulla to help replenish the beaches, and work will begin in early 2023.

Giant waves hit the coast in mid-July and eroded the sandbar, forcing the beach to close and the lifeguard tower to be relocated (photo, the coastal erosion)

Giant waves hit the coast in mid-July and eroded the sandbar, forcing the beach to close and the lifeguard tower to be relocated (photo, the coastal erosion)

Giant waves hit the coast in mid-July and eroded the sandbar, forcing the beach to close and the lifeguard tower to be relocated (photo, the coastal erosion)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, Cronulla Beach)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, Cronulla Beach)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, Cronulla Beach)

Fortunately, the recent calmer weather conditions have provided some relief to our coasts, allowing the Council to proceed with the planned short-term beach remediation efforts.

Leanne Farmer, an independent councilor with the Sutherland Shire Council, took to Facebook earlier this week to update locals about the works.

“More than 6,000 tons of sandstone boulders have now been installed to protect the shores and restore beach access and emergency repairs to reinforce the Prince Street Seawall have been completed,” she said.

Ms Farmer said the council had also begun ‘beach scraping’ works across 2km of beach between the Prince Street seawall and Greenhills.

She said the beach scraping mimicked the beach’s natural recovery process, but increased the beach’s recovery rate.

A large crane has been used to dump the tons of sandstone after thousands of cubic yards of sand were swept off the Bate Bay foreshore (photo, post-storm damage)

A large crane has been used to dump the tons of sandstone after thousands of cubic yards of sand were swept off the Bate Bay foreshore (photo, post-storm damage)

A large crane has been used to dump the tons of sandstone after thousands of cubic yards of sand were swept off the Bate Bay foreshore (photo, post-storm damage)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, North Cronulla Beach)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, North Cronulla Beach)

The council will seek grant funding for projects including an upgrade of the esplanade north of the beach and a buried sea wall (photo, North Cronulla Beach)

“The restoration of numerous beach access paths using earth-moving equipment has been included in the beach scraping work,” she said.

Last month’s powerful storms caused significant damage to beaches in the county of Sydney, including the coastline of Cronulla and Maroubra.

The Randwick City Council posted images of sand being blown all the way to footpaths after gale-force winds and powerful waves wreaked havoc on the waterfront.

The strong winds threw some 70cm of sand on Maroubra Road with the mounds of sand making the suburb look more like a ski field – with trucks deployed to clean up the mess.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Sutherland Shire Council for comment.

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