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The Queen dies: Kyle Sandilands says he feels like a family member has died

A devastated Kyle Sandilands paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on Friday morning, after she awoke to the news that Her Majesty had passed away at the age of 96.

The KIIS FM radio host, a proud royalist and lifelong supporter of The Queen, said the loss felt like a death in the family.

“It feels like a family member has passed away,” he told his co-anchor Jackie ‘O’ Henderson, who broke down in tears several times during the broadcast.

A devastated Kyle Sandilands (pictured) paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on Friday morning, after she woke up to the news that Her Majesty had passed away at the age of 96

A devastated Kyle Sandilands (pictured) paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on Friday morning, after she woke up to the news that Her Majesty had passed away at the age of 96

“I know some people will say, ‘Oh, get over yourself,’ but no, I really loved her. I did wave flags on the side of the road as she drove by.

‘It’s a sad day. Many people will feel that pain a lot.’

Sandilands said earlier in February that he was specifically a supporter of the Queen, but was less enthusiastic about the other members of the royal family.

He suggested at the time that he would withdraw his support for the monarchy after the Queen’s death.

1662674906 859 The Queen dies Kyle Sandilands says he feels like a

1662674906 859 The Queen dies Kyle Sandilands says he feels like a

“It feels like a family member has passed away,” said his co-anchor Jackie ‘O’ Henderson (pictured), who broke down in tears several times during the broadcast.

However, he said on Friday that he had accepted King Charles III’s idea and would continue to support the monarchy in Australia.

Australia has joined much of the world in mourning Queen Elizabeth II as her death marks the first change of head of state in more than seven decades.

A statement from Buckingham Palace early on Friday (AEST) confirmed the death of the 96-year-old.

“The Queen passed away peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon,” Buckingham Palace said.

“The King and Queen Consort remain in Balmoral tonight and return to London tomorrow.”

Australia has joined much of the world in mourning Queen Elizabeth II as her death marks the first change of head of state in more than seven decades.  She is pictured receiving flowers from school children waving flags after a Commonwealth Day Service in Sydney in March 2006

Australia has joined much of the world in mourning Queen Elizabeth II as her death marks the first change of head of state in more than seven decades.  She is pictured receiving flowers from school children waving flags after a Commonwealth Day Service in Sydney in March 2006

Australia has joined much of the world in mourning Queen Elizabeth II as her death marks the first change of head of state in more than seven decades. She is pictured receiving flowers from school children waving flags after a Commonwealth Day Service in Sydney in March 2006

Flags will fly at half-mast over Australia on Friday as the country waits to hear how the official mourning process will unfold.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese paid tribute to the Queen, who will be succeeded by her son King Charles III in a move expected to renew the Republican debate in Australia.

“A historic reign and a long life devoted to duty, family, faith and service has come to an end,” Albanian said in a statement.

“The government and people of Australia offer our deepest condolences to the Royal Family, who are mourning a beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother – the person who has been their greatest inner strength for so long.”

Mr Albanese said that ‘from her famous maiden voyage to Australia, the only reigning sovereign to ever visit, it was clear that Her Majesty had a special place in her heart for Australia’.

“Fifteen more tours before cheering crowds in every part of our country confirmed the special place she had occupied in ours.”

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese offered his condolences to the Royal Family, the British people and all of his own citizens who held in the highest regard for Her Majesty

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese offered his condolences to the Royal Family, the British people and all of his own citizens who held in the highest regard for Her Majesty

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese offered his condolences to the Royal Family, the British people and all of his own citizens who held in the highest regard for Her Majesty

He praised the Queen’s relationship with Australia and the rest of the world.

“As monarch for more than half of the life of our Federation, the relationship between Australia and Great Britain has matured and evolved during Her Majesty’s reign,” he said.

The Queen greeted every change with understanding, good grace and an abiding faith in the judgment of the Australian people.

This was the deft and diplomatic way she connected the diversity of the modern Commonwealth, countries around the world that will mourn her passing.

“This time of mourning will pass, but the deep respect and warm respect in which the Australians have always cherished Her Majesty will never fade.”

The Queen first visited Australia with Prince Philip in 1954, arriving on the SS Gothic which was steaming into Sydney Harbor after nearly six weeks at sea.  She is pictured with Prince Philip in the parliament building in Canberra on that tour

The Queen first visited Australia with Prince Philip in 1954, arriving on the SS Gothic which was steaming into Sydney Harbor after nearly six weeks at sea.  She is pictured with Prince Philip in the parliament building in Canberra on that tour

The Queen first visited Australia with Prince Philip in 1954, arriving on the SS Gothic which was steaming into Sydney Harbor after nearly six weeks at sea. She is pictured with Prince Philip in the parliament building in Canberra on that tour

The Queen visited Australia in 1954, 1963, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2011 - her last time on these coasts.  She is pictured in 1981

The Queen visited Australia in 1954, 1963, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2011 - her last time on these coasts.  She is pictured in 1981

The Queen visited Australia in 1954, 1963, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2011 – her last time on these coasts. She is pictured in 1981

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor has been Queen of the United Kingdom and 14 Commonwealth realms, including Australia, since her reign began in February 1952.

Governor General David Hurley said Australians should be inspired by the Queen’s contribution.

“She was truly a remarkable person,” he said in a statement.

The Queen's last visit to Australia came in 2011 when then Labor Prime Minister Julia Gillard described her as 'an essential constitutional part of Australian democracy'.  She is pictured in Perth during that trip

The Queen's last visit to Australia came in 2011 when then Labor Prime Minister Julia Gillard described her as 'an essential constitutional part of Australian democracy'.  She is pictured in Perth during that trip

The Queen’s last visit to Australia came in 2011 when then Labor Prime Minister Julia Gillard described her as ‘an essential constitutional part of Australian democracy’. She is pictured in Perth during that trip

“When I think back to my own memories—she was my queen all my life—I think of Her Majesty’s dignity and compassion. Her dedication and tireless work ethic. And her selflessness and unwavering devotion to the people she served. To us.’

Federal Opposition Leader Peter Dutton was grateful for the Queen’s devoted service.

Today a comforting warmth has left the world. One of humanity’s brightest lights has gone out,” he said.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanian’s Full Tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

With the death of Queen Elizabeth II, a historic reign and a long life devoted to duty, family, faith and service has come to an end.

The Government and people of Australia offer our deepest condolences to the Royal Family, who mourn a beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother – the person who has been their greatest inner strength for so long.

Australian hearts go out to the people of the United Kingdom who are grieving today, knowing they will feel they have lost a part of what makes their nation whole.

There is comfort in Her Majesty’s own words: “Sorrow is the price we pay for love.”

This is a loss we all feel, as few have known a world without Queen Elizabeth II. In her seven remarkable decades on the throne, Her Majesty was a rare and reassuring constant amid rapid changes. Through the noise and tumult of the years she embodied and radiated a timeless decency and an enduring calm.

From the moment the young princess became queen, carrying on her shoulders the mighty weight of the institution into which she was born, Her Majesty made devotion to duty and service above herself the hallmark of her reign.

She celebrated our good times, she stood with us in the bad. Happy and glorious, but also steadfast. In particular, we remember the compassion and personal kindness she showed to Australians affected by tragedy and disaster.

Throughout it all, she was a monarch who showed her humanity and fulfilled her duty with fidelity, integrity and humor. In this she was supported for so long and so lovingly by the late Prince Philip, her “strength and support” for 73 years.

From her famous maiden voyage to Australia, the only reigning sovereign she has ever visited, it was clear that Her Majesty had a special place in her heart for Australia.

Fifteen more tours before cheering crowds in every part of our country confirmed the special place she had occupied in ours.

As monarch for more than half of our Federation’s life, the relationship between Australia and Great Britain developed during Her Majesty’s reign.

The Queen greeted every change with understanding, good grace and an abiding faith in the judgment of the Australian people.

This was the deft and diplomatic way she connected the diversity of the modern Commonwealth, countries around the world that will mourn her passing.

Today marks the end of an era, the end of the second Elizabethan era. This time of mourning will pass, but the deep respect and warm respect in which the Australians have always cherished Her Majesty will never fade.

May she rest in eternal peace.

.