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The Project hosts and Abbie Chatfield call for TikTok to remove Andrew Tate content

‘Misogynistic’ TikToker Andrew Tate bragging about beating a woman and making abhorrent remarks about rape is criticized by hosts of The Project calling for social media platform to kick him off platform

  • Rachel Corbett and Abbie Chatfield from the project weighed in on Andrew Tate
  • They said Tate’s TikTok content promotes young boys to misogynistic views
  • Tate was labeled ‘the king of poisonous masculinity’ and has gone viral for his views

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Hosts of The Project and Abbie Chatfield have called for TikTok’s most “dangerous” influencer Andrew Tate to be banned from the platform for promoting misogyny.

British-American kickboxer turned ‘realistic’ podcaster Andrew Tate has received massive attention on TikTok for promoting a ‘masculine’ lifestyle involving cigars, private jets and humiliating women.

On Sunday evening, The Project panelist Rachel Corbett and Australian influencer Abbie Chatfield weighed in on the issue and called on TikTok to remove Tate’s content from the platform.

Scroll down for the video.

The project has called for content related to Andrew Tate (above) to be removed from the platform for fear his misogynistic views affect young boys

The project has called for content related to Andrew Tate (above) to be removed from the platform for fear his misogynistic views affect young boys

They were particularly concerned about how Tate’s content influences young teenage boys to harbor derogatory views of women.

“Kids consider Instagram and TikTok and the idea of ​​11.6 billion views a success,” said Ms Corbett.

‘That then says that those (misogynistic) views must be good, because look how famous (Tate) is, then I want to match that.

“It’s just really dangerous and I feel like TikTok has a responsibility to remove misogynistic posts.”

Abbie Chatfield (above) pointed out that one of her videos was taken down by TikTok for wearing a 'white shirt', but 'there are endless videos of (Tate) saying women are owned and other extremely despicable misogynistic things'

Abbie Chatfield (above) pointed out that one of her videos was taken down by TikTok for wearing a 'white shirt', but 'there are endless videos of (Tate) saying women are owned and other extremely despicable misogynistic things'

Abbie Chatfield (above) pointed out that one of her videos was taken down by TikTok for wearing a ‘white shirt’, but ‘there are endless videos of (Tate) saying women are owned and other extremely despicable misogynistic things’

Chatfield compared how TikTok applies its Community Guidelines to Tate’s content versus its own.

“I uploaded a TikTok in a white shirt, with a bra on, and it was removed within a minute,” she said.

“But there are endless videos where he says women are property and other extreme, despicable misogyny. How can that slip through the cracks, but not me in a shirt?’

Born in Chicago but raised in Bedfordshire, Andrew Tate has exploded on TikTok for the past three months as “the king of toxic masculinity.”

Its content, which degrades women as “property” and encourages boys to live a “hustler lifestyle,” has led a wave of young teenage boys to associate his fame and wealth with the mistreatment of women.

The project found on TikTok after just a few hours, more than half of a teenage boy’s content will be related to Andrew Tate.

In addition to hundreds of fan accounts sharing his content on TikTok, Tate encourages young guys to emulate his mindset through his “Hustler’s University,” which promises get-rich-quick schemes using cryptocurrency, property, or e-commerce.

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