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The Great Resignation: Why Millions of Aussies Are Expected to Leave Their Jobs in Early 2022

Millions of Australians plan to quit their jobs or change careers early next year in a phenomenon dubbed ‘The Great Resignation’, experts warn.

Workers – especially those in construction and corporate environments – have reassessed their personal values ​​after being forced to change ‘all aspects’ of their lives during prolonged lockdowns, especially in Melbourne and Sydney.

Social researcher and demographer Mark McCrindle told the Daily Mail Australia that changing career paths was once the ‘biggest decision’ a person could make, but it seems much less daunting after the turmoil of the pandemic.

“People are reassessing how they live, where they live, how they commute to work and whether their job will affect this new way of living,” said Mr McCrindle.

Melbourne-based career and LinkedIn specialist Sue Ellson agreed, saying employees have had extra time in the past 18 months to “reflect and re-evaluate their lives,” giving them the opportunity to share their personal values, to question strengths and circumstances.

The big layoff is expected to happen in March 2022 as more workers are asked to return to office or job boards in the new year.

Ongoing lockdowns, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne, have forced Australians to change 'all aspects' of their lives, leading to a lot of reappraisal of personal values.  As a result, millions are expected to step down next year (stock image)

Ongoing lockdowns, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne, have forced Australians to change ‘all aspects’ of their lives, leading to a lot of reappraisal of personal values. As a result, millions are expected to step down next year (stock image)

Demographer Mark McCrindle (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia that changing careers was once the 'biggest decision' a person could make, but now a pandemic makes that choice seem unimportant

Demographer Mark McCrindle (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia that changing careers was once the 'biggest decision' a person could make, but now a pandemic makes that choice seem unimportant

Demographer Mark McCrindle (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia that changing careers was once the ‘biggest decision’ a person could make, but now a pandemic makes that choice seem unimportant

“Many ask, ‘What do I really think is important in life?’ or “what’s most important to me and how can I adjust my life to make sure it fits?” said Mr. McCrindle.

“As a result, we’re seeing an increase in people moving out of cities and into regional areas because it’s more affordable.”

According to a study conducted by Mr. McCrindle in the midst of the pandemic, 50 percent of Aussies plan to look for a new home to rent or buy that contains more of what they value in the next two years.

A massive 60 percent have considered moving to a regional area, while 42 percent are attracted to the idea of ​​moving out of the city but keeping a job in the CBD.

A massive 60 percent of Australians have considered moving to a regional area, while 42 percent are attracted to the idea of ​​moving out of the city but keeping a job in the CBD

A massive 60 percent of Australians have considered moving to a regional area, while 42 percent are attracted to the idea of ​​moving out of the city but keeping a job in the CBD

A massive 60 percent of Australians have considered moving to a regional area, while 42 percent are attracted to the idea of ​​moving out of the city but keeping a job in the CBD

The construction, trade and utility sectors are expected to be most affected by The Great Resignation, as well as those who work in offices, Mr McCrindle revealed.

“This will affect all areas and industries as people have created different routines for themselves and may not want to commute to the CBD,” he said.

“Currently, there is a labor and skill shortage in the trade, which would be of no use to employers if several employees resign at the same time.”

As there are currently 13 million people in the labor market, this will also affect people of all ages who work full-time, part-time or casual hours.

The construction, trade and utility sectors are likely to be heavily impacted by The Great Resignation, as will those who work in offices, Mr McCrindle revealed (stock image)

The construction, trade and utility sectors are likely to be heavily impacted by The Great Resignation, as will those who work in offices, Mr McCrindle revealed (stock image)

The construction, trade and utility sectors are likely to be heavily impacted by The Great Resignation, as will those who work in offices, Mr McCrindle revealed (stock image)

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it's best to consider all your options before resigning

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it's best to consider all your options before resigning

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it’s best to consider all your options before resigning

Mr. McCrindle said between now and March 2022, employers and CEOs have the “opportunity” to show employees that they are valued by caring for teams and focusing on a positive work culture.

For employees, it can be considered “the perfect storm” and a great opportunity to ask for a raise or consider alternative employment options based on personal values.

It’s also considered a “once in a lifetime” opportunity to change career paths or jobs to fit the “new normal” lifestyle, he said.

Those who resign early are part of the 85 percent of workers worldwide who experienced higher levels of burnout while working from home during the pandemic.

“Based on the trends and the research, I think this is a great opportunity for employees to change jobs because we don’t want people to get stuck in positions they’re not passionate about,” said Mr. McCrindle.

According to a study conducted by McCrindle in the midst of the pandemic, half of Aussies plan to look for a new home to rent or buy in the next two years with more of what they value.

According to a study conducted by McCrindle in the midst of the pandemic, half of Aussies plan to look for a new home to rent or buy in the next two years with more of what they value.

According to a study conducted by McCrindle in the midst of the pandemic, half of Aussies plan to look for a new home to rent or buy in the next two years with more of what they value.

Ms. Ellson said that while many employees like to jump, it’s important for them to assess whether a new career is what they really want.

“As with any change, it’s wise to look at all the variables and the pros and cons of a new career,” said Ms. Ellson.

However, the grass is not necessarily greener on the other side of the fence.

“In a world of uncertainty, it’s time to resettle and then start over, not necessarily to resign.”

What should you do before you quit your job?

1. Remind yourself – add all your experience and skills to your resume and LinkedIn profile

2. Reflect – look at your overall career and life goals and what has been good and bad in the past five years

3. Research – look closely at what you could learn (short courses including personal skills, not just technical skills), ask (seek impartial professional guidance) and find (meaningful evidence)

4. Review – all your options (you may want to complete this process during a fun vacation) and think about what you can do part-time to test the water

5. Ready – make the best possible effort to take ongoing steps in line with your bigger plan, knowing that every small step is part of your progress (an ongoing coach or mentor can also be helpful)

Source: Sue Ellson

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