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Terry Crews is accused of ‘cosplaying like a poor person’ in ‘deranged’ Amazon ad

Terry Crews has come under fire for “cosplaying like a poor person” in his new Amazon ad encouraging people to work for the online retailer, as critics accuse him of being a “sold out” and a “union breaker.”

The chilling commercial shows the 53-year-old actor dressed in an Amazon uniform, complete with an orange safety vest, mask and gloves, as he excitedly packs orders and hangs out with employees at one of the company’s distribution centers.

“I heard Amazon was hiring a billion people and thought I’d check it out myself,” he says in the ad, which rolled out on TikTok.

Crews—who has an estimate? net value of $25 million — making it seem like a pleasure to work for the e-commerce giant, which continues to face backlash over its employees’ treatment and grueling working conditions.

Partnership: Terry Crews, 53, stars in a new Amazon ad encouraging people to apply to the company while touting its benefits, paid tuition and flexible hours

Partnership: Terry Crews, 53, stars in a new Amazon ad encouraging people to apply to the company while touting its benefits, paid tuition and flexible hours

Outrage: Crews, with an estimated net worth of $25 million, was stabbed for 'cosplaying like a poor person' while taking on the role of an Amazon worker

Outrage: Crews, with an estimated net worth of $25 million, was stabbed for 'cosplaying like a poor person' while taking on the role of an Amazon worker

Outrage: Crews, with an estimated net worth of $25 million, was stabbed for ‘cosplaying like a poor person’ while taking on the role of an Amazon worker

During what appears to be a leisurely lunch break, he asks an employee in a wheelchair if Amazon pays tuition. When she confirms that the company does, he replies with a laugh, “So what do you think my major should be?”

According to the Amazon website, “eligible employees” may be paid up to “100 percent of tuition and fees (up to an annual maximum)” by the company to “go to a certificate or diploma in qualified fields of study.’

In another awkward scene in the ad, Crews’ eyes light up when she sees someone driving a forklift in the warehouse.

“Wait, can I drive a forklift?” he asks.

The commercial ends with the former NFL player touting Amazon’s “benefits,” “paid tuition” and “flexible hours” while urging people to apply for the many job openings across the country.

Crews, who shared the video on his own TikTok account, received hundreds of negative reactions to the campaign.

Yikes: The commercial shows the actor wearing an Amazon uniform as he excitedly packs orders and hangs out with employees at one of the company's distribution centers

Yikes: The commercial shows the actor wearing an Amazon uniform as he excitedly packs orders and hangs out with employees at one of the company's distribution centers

Yikes: The commercial shows the actor wearing an Amazon uniform as he excitedly packs orders and hangs out with employees at one of the company’s distribution centers

Having fun?  Crews makes it seem like it's a pleasure to work for Amazon, which continues to face backlash over its employees' treatment and grueling work conditions

Having fun?  Crews makes it seem like it's a pleasure to work for Amazon, which continues to face backlash over its employees' treatment and grueling work conditions

Having fun?  Crews makes it seem like it's a pleasure to work for Amazon, which continues to face backlash over its employees' treatment and grueling work conditions

Having fun?  Crews makes it seem like it's a pleasure to work for Amazon, which continues to face backlash over its employees' treatment and grueling work conditions

Having fun? Crews makes it seem like it’s a pleasure to work for Amazon, which continues to face backlash over its employees’ treatment and grueling work conditions

Cringe: During what appears to be a leisurely lunch break, he asks a worker in a wheelchair if Amazon pays tuition, then ponders when to get into

Cringe: During what appears to be a leisurely lunch break, he asks a worker in a wheelchair if Amazon pays tuition, then ponders when to get into

Cringe: During what appears to be a leisurely lunch break, he asks a worker in a wheelchair if Amazon pays tuition, then ponders when to get into

Bottom line: The ad ends with Crews touting Amazon’s “benefits,” “paid tuition,” and “flexible hours,” while urging people to apply for the many open positions across the country

Backlash: Crews, who shared the video on his own TikTok account, received hundreds of negative reactions to the campaign

Backlash: Crews, who shared the video on his own TikTok account, received hundreds of negative reactions to the campaign

Backlash: Crews, who shared the video on his own TikTok account, received hundreds of negative reactions to the campaign

“Bro, I dare you to work there for a month. You’d think twice about how they treat employees,” one TikTok user wrote, while another added, “Terry no…don’t support union busters.”

Others point to claims that employees don’t have time to go to the toilet, and one commenter asked, “Yes, but do the benefits include a break in the toilet or not?”

The Amazon ad has also been pierced on Twitter, where many have pointed out that the company has chosen to hire Crews for a commercial rather than pay its employees more.

Amazon: We can’t afford to pay our employees more. Also Amazon: We’re going to pay Terry Crews a boatload of money to come and play as a poor person for a few hours,” one critic tweeted.

“This is Terry Crews cosplaying herself like a poor person to run a union breaking ad,” another added.

“Be interesting to know how many hours each Amazon employee has to work to earn what Terry Crews got for that place,” commented another.

Criticism: Crews has been branded a 'sellout' and 'union buster' for the crappy ad

Criticism: Crews has been branded a 'sellout' and 'union buster' for the crappy ad

Criticism: Crews has been branded a ‘sellout’ and ‘union buster’ for the crappy ad

'Propaganda': The Amazon ad was also shared on Twitter, where critics split him and the company

'Propaganda': The Amazon ad was also shared on Twitter, where critics split him and the company

‘Propaganda’: The Amazon ad was also shared on Twitter, where critics split him and the company

Many called him a “sold out” and a “union breaker” for his support of the company, which has commanded major unions since its founding in 1994.

The ad starring Crews rolled out just a few weeks after it was announced that the company is hiring 150,000 employees for the holiday season.

Seasonal positions include sign-up bonuses up to $3,000 and, depending on the services, an additional salary of $3 per hour. The median starting salary was also increased to more than $18 an hour in September.

Amazon’s working conditions, however, have long been the subject of research, including reports of unsafe working conditions, insufficient bathroom breaks, and unmanageable productivity demands.

Some called the new commercial “Amazon propaganda,” including a Twitter user who claimed to have worked for the company.

“I appreciate Terry Crews bringing some positivity and I can certainly appreciate that the dude is a lot fitter physically to do that job than I was, but as a former Amazon employee the whole thing is paid tuition and flexible hours 100% bulls* *t ,’ He wrote.

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