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Tennis stars not vaccinated against Covid-19 will be able to play at the Australian Open

Leaked Bombshell emails reveal how unvaccinated tennis stars will be allowed to play at the Australian Open, but they won’t like the conditions

  • Unvaccinated stars will be able to compete at next year’s Australian Open.
  • Follow rumors that those who haven’t had both strokes may be banned from competing
  • Defending men’s champion Novak Djokovic said he is ‘opposed to vaccination’
  • Leaked email from women’s tennis top revealed new rules for female players
  • Those vaccinated will have ‘total freedom of movement’ in the tournament
  • Those not vaccinated must spend 14 days in quarantine and undergo ‘periodic tests’


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Unvaccinated tennis stars will be allowed to compete in next year’s Australian Open, but must remain in quarantine for 14 days and follow strict Covid testing rules, a leaked internal email revealed.

The Women’s Tennis Association told its unvaccinated players on Sunday that they will need to spend two weeks in hotel quarantine before competing in Melbourne.

Rather, the email said that fully vaccinated players will have ‘complete freedom of movement’ in addition to being screened by Covid before and after arrival.

The Grand Slam is scheduled to take place in January and defending male champion Novak Djokovic, a strong critic of Australia’s quarantine system who has said he is ‘opposed to vaccination’, is chasing a record number 21.

Unvaccinated tennis stars will be able to compete in next year's Australian Open, a leaked email revealed.  Rumors were circulating that defending male champion Novak Djokovic (pictured) could be kicked out of the tournament after he said he is 'opposed to vaccination'

Unvaccinated tennis stars will be able to compete in next year’s Australian Open, a leaked email revealed. Rumors were circulating that defending male champion Novak Djokovic (pictured) could be kicked out of the tournament after he said he is ‘opposed to vaccination’

The Women's Tennis Association told its players on Sunday that those who have not received both hits from Covid-19 will have to spend two weeks in hotel quarantine before playing in the Australian Open.

The Women's Tennis Association told its players on Sunday that those who have not received both hits from Covid-19 will have to spend two weeks in hotel quarantine before playing in the Australian Open.

Unvaccinated players will need to be quarantined for 14 days and follow strict Covid testing rules.

Unvaccinated players will need to be quarantined for 14 days and follow strict Covid testing rules.

The Women’s Tennis Association told its players on Sunday that those who have not received both hits from Covid-19 will have to spend two weeks in hotel quarantine before playing in the Australian Open.

Some of the top 10 players also expressed doubts, including Ukraine’s Elina Svitolina and world No. 2 Aryna Sabalenka.

The WTA said it was sharing the new rules after meeting with Tennis Australia last week to “clear up false and misleading information” about next year’s tournament.

“Tennis Australia has asked us to wait a few days before talking about it, as they were still working with the government on the details,” the email shared on Twitter by the New York Times reporter leaks. Ben rothenberg said.

“As Victoria’s vaccination rate will reach 80 percent by the end of the week and 90 percent next month, it has been confirmed that conditions for players at the Australian Open will improve significantly.”

In addition to spending two weeks in hotel quarantine, the WTA said its unvaccinated players must also undergo “regular tests” during their stay at Melbourne Park.

The announcement comes days after Victoria’s Prime Minister Daniel Andrews revealed on Friday that his state would remove quarantine rules for overseas arrivals as of November 1.

The grand slam will take place in January at Melbourne Park.  In the photo, spectators in the crowd watching the men's singles second round match between Alex De Miñaur of Australia and Pablo Cuevas of Uruguay.

The grand slam will take place in January at Melbourne Park.  In the photo, spectators in the crowd watching the men's singles second round match between Alex De Miñaur of Australia and Pablo Cuevas of Uruguay.

The grand slam will take place in January at Melbourne Park. In the photo, spectators in the crowd watching the men’s singles second round match between Alex De Miñaur of Australia and Pablo Cuevas of Uruguay.

It was previously reported that the state government would insist that all players be vaccinated.

Such a mandate could mean banning the world’s No. 1 male, No. 2 female and ten other top Grand Slam players.

Djokovic earlier this year declined to comment when asked directly if he had been punctured, but in April 2020 he said: “ personally, I am opposed to vaccination, and I would not want someone to force me to take a vaccine for be able to do it. ” to travel’.

During last year's Australian Open, female star Yulia Putintseva made a poster calling for a chance for the players to come out of the hard quarantine.

During last year's Australian Open, female star Yulia Putintseva made a poster calling for a chance for the players to come out of the hard quarantine.

During last year’s Australian Open, female star Yulia Putintseva made a poster calling for a chance for the players to come out of the hard quarantine.

Russian world number two Daniil Medvedev, who tested positive for Covid-19 in April, made similar comments when he said in February: “Personally, I will not be vaccinated for medical reasons related to vaccines.”

Third and fourth-place players Stefanos Tsitsipas and Alexander Zverev have expressed their hesitancy to get a Covid shot, and Zverev has said the issue had “gotten too political for my liking.”

Tennis Australia boss Craig Tiley has been warning for months that some star players would be absent from the Australian Open if a vaccine mandate was introduced.

Greek star Stefanos Tsitsipas (pictured) would also likely not appear at the Australian Open if a vaccine mandate was introduced.

Greek star Stefanos Tsitsipas (pictured) would also likely not appear at the Australian Open if a vaccine mandate was introduced.

Greek star Stefanos Tsitsipas (pictured) would also likely not appear at the Australian Open if a vaccine mandate was introduced.

If Djokovic wins his 21st Grand Slam, he would surpass both Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, and Tiley desperately wishes for that moment to happen in Australia.

The Australian Open was held in Melbourne in January 2021, before the Delta strain arrived in the country, thanks to players who endured a 14-day quarantine.

With some players critical of last year’s quarantine conditions, including Djokovic’s boss, there were reports that the event could be moved to Doha or Dubai to keep players happy.

‘We are the only country where quarantine is required. We have to find a way to manage that and we will, ” Tiley said in May.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Tennis Australia for comment.

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