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Teen cancer survivor left ‘horrified’ after chemo port scar edited from her yearbook photo

A cancer survivor from Evansville, Indiana, was left “disrespected and disgusted” after a yearbook company removed her chemotherapy scar from her high school photo without her permission.

Allison Hale (16) wanted the world to know she wasn’t ashamed of her scars. So she requested that her yearbook photo, taken by Straub Photography, be left “untouched” and specifically wear clothes that she knew would show off the scar that saved her life.

So when she discovered that the scar on her neck had been digitally removed from her school photo without her permission, “her heart sank right to her stomach.”

“When I pulled out the photo, my whole face fell down. I felt like my heart dropped right to my stomach because [my port] is so important to me, and it just got completely erased,” she said People Magazine.

A teen who survived cancer was left 'disrespected and disgusted' after receiving her yearbook photo (pictured) and found her chemotherapy port scar had been edited out

A teen who survived cancer was left ‘disrespected and disgusted’ after receiving her yearbook photo (left) and finding her chemotherapy port scar had been worked out

Allison Hale, 16, asked to leave her school image (pictured) “untouched” and wear specific clothes that she knew would show off the scar that saved her life

Allison explained that she thinks the scar is “beautiful” and says it is “something that makes me who I am”

The Evansville, Indiana student was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2020 just before Christmas

The Evansville, Indiana student was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2020 just before Christmas

The Evansville, Indiana student was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2020 just before Christmas

Allison, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma in 2020 shortly before Christmas, explained on Facebook that she thinks the scar is “beautiful” and says it is “something that makes me who I am.”

“I really feel incredibly respected and disgusted,” she wrote.

“I ordered pristine photos. I wore a sweater to specifically show off my gate scar. I love to show it, I’m not ashamed of it.

“We all know I’ve been through hell and back in the past year, and I want to show off my proof of living and winning. I don’t want it covered. I don’t feel ashamed or ashamed of it.

“But apparently scars are uncomfortable. Scars are unacceptable. Scars are something to hide and to be ashamed of.’

The teen continued: ‘Here we have an updated photo, which hides the trauma that I love and that I literally hold so close to my heart. Something that makes me who I am.

“Maybe this sounds dramatic, but to me they covered up my life and the source of what healed me, and that feels like a new level of disrespect on my part.”

After voicing her concerns to the photographers, Allison said they apologized and quickly restored the image. DailyMail.com has reached out to Straub Photography for comment.

“Maybe this sounds dramatic, but to me they covered my life and the source of what healed me, and that feels like a new level of disrespect on my part,” she said.

The 16-year-old wants to remind everyone that all bodies are beautiful - imperfections and all.  She said, 'Please stop editing yourself and others to fit what society has made the standard'

The 16-year-old wants to remind everyone that all bodies are beautiful - imperfections and all.  She said, 'Please stop editing yourself and others to fit what society has made the standard'

“Scars are nothing that needs to be hidden, covered or edited.  Every body has a scar somewhere, and that's beautiful,

“Scars are nothing that needs to be hidden, covered or edited.  Every body has a scar somewhere, and that's beautiful,

The 16-year-old wants to remind everyone that all bodies are beautiful – imperfections and all. She said, ‘Please stop editing yourself and others to fit what society has made the standard’

Allison underwent five chemotherapy treatments and 20 radiation therapies, and in July she learned she was cancer-free

Allison underwent five chemotherapy treatments and 20 radiation therapies, and in July she learned she was cancer-free

Allison underwent five chemotherapy treatments and 20 radiation therapies, and in July she learned she was cancer-free

Allison explained that when she was first diagnosed last year, it was very difficult for her.

‘A lot happened in my life, outside of my health. I was already in a bad position mentally,” she recalls.

“Then being diagnosed with cancer just before Christmas at age 15 diminishes any sense of confidence and worth you feel.

‘Because now you are sick and sad and feeling all the emotions. There was anger, there was fear. I was terrified of what was to come, and lonely, very isolated.’

But when she started treatment in January at Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis, she immediately felt less alone.

“I met the nurses… and they didn’t make things seem so scary,” Allison said.

“Of course it was still scary, but with that support and other kids going through the same around you, it makes a big difference.”

When it came time to shave her hair, she admitted she was nervous at first. But once it was done, she felt more confident than ever.

“As soon as I shaved my hair, I was a completely new person. I didn’t want to cover it up,’ she explained.

‘That was who I am. That was the image of what I was going through and how strong I was to be able to show it.

‘I was immediately so happy that I didn’t have that burden on my shoulders and that I could take control of it.’

Allison underwent five rounds of chemotherapy and 20 sessions of radiation therapy, and in July she learned she was cancer-free. A few months later, she went to get her yearbook photo — a day she described as “incredibly important.”

“Because at some point you think, ‘Okay, I may never have another birthday or another yearbook photo,'” she explained.

“I was just so ecstatic to have another photo and to be able to show the new person, the stronger Allison, that I had become.”

Allison hopes to someday study forensic psychology in college

Allison hopes to someday study forensic psychology in college

Allison hopes to someday study forensic psychology in college

The 16-year-old, who hopes to someday study forensic psychology at university, knows that not everyone is as confident as she is when it comes to scars, and she wanted to remind everyone that all bodies are beautiful — imperfections and all.

“Scars are nothing that needs to be hidden, covered or edited. Every body has a scar somewhere, and that’s beautiful,” she said.

“Every body is beautiful, with every scar, dimple, curve, bump and bruise it holds. So please stop adjusting yourself and others to what society has made the norm. Make your own standard and live by it.’

It turns out this isn’t the first time something like this has happened. In May, a Florida high school came under fire for editing 80 yearbook photos of female students in an effort to make their outfits more conservative.

Bartram Trail High School in St. John said they asked the yearbook committee to photoshop the photos because they felt they were “inappropriate” and violated the school’s dress code.

Girls had pulled up the necklines of their shirts and covered their shoulders. However, photos of guys in cramped speedos were left unedited.

When parents became enraged, they offered refunds to anyone who wanted to return the yearbook.

A mother told Action News Jax that she thought the school was sending young girls the “wrong message” by trimming their cleavage, saying it “sends the message that our girls should be ashamed of their growing bodies.”

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