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SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 53 Starlink satellites in 175th launch for Elon Musk's company

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 53 Starlinks into orbit from Florida – marks the 175th launch for Elon Musk’s company and the 57th launch of the broadband internet satellites

  • SpaceX successfully launched 53 Starlinks into orbit today at 3:21 PM ET
  • The Falcon 9 two-stage rocket has lifted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida
  • The flight was the thirty-seventh orbital launch for this Falcon 9 rocket and the fifty-seventh Starlink launch
  • Starlink has over 400,000 subscribers in 38 countries and costs $110 per month with a $599 one-time equipment fee

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SpaceX successfully launched 53 Starlinks into orbit on Friday using a Falcon 9 rocket to take the internet satellites to space.

The rocket took off from the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida at 3:21 p.m. ET.

The flight was the thirty-seventh orbital launch for this Falcon 9 rocket and the fifty-seventh Starlink launch — a record-breaking launch frequency for Elon Musk’s company.

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SpaceX successfully launched 53 Starlinks into orbit on Friday using a Falcon 9 rocket to take the internet satellites to space

SpaceX successfully launched 53 Starlinks into orbit on Friday using a Falcon 9 rocket to take the internet satellites to space

The flight was the thirty-seventh orbital launch for this Falcon 9 rocket and the fifty-seventh Starlink launch—maintaining a record-breaking launch frequency for Elon Musk's company.

The flight was the thirty-seventh orbital launch for this Falcon 9 rocket and the fifty-seventh Starlink launch—maintaining a record-breaking launch frequency for Elon Musk's company.

The flight was the thirty-seventh orbital launch for this Falcon 9 rocket and the fifty-seventh Starlink launch—maintaining a record-breaking launch frequency for Elon Musk’s company.

Although there was a 50 percent chance of a weather violation, the launch happened without incident on a partly cloudy day.

This also marked the 130th landing of a first Falcon 9 stage and the 175th overall launch for SpaceX, both major milestones for the reusable, more affordable rockets Musk’s company has developed.

The first stage booster to support this mission previously launched GPS III Space Vehicle 04, GPS III Space Vehicle 05, Inspiration4, Ax-1, Nilesat 301, and three Starlink missions.

After delivering the 53 Starlinks, the rocket’s first stage made a safe landing on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida.

After delivering the 53 Starlinks, the rocket's first stage made a safe landing on the 'A Shortfall of Gravitas' droneship (above) in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida

After delivering the 53 Starlinks, the rocket's first stage made a safe landing on the 'A Shortfall of Gravitas' droneship (above) in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida

After delivering the 53 Starlinks, the rocket’s first stage made a safe landing on the ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ droneship (above) in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida

The first stage booster to support this mission previously launched GPS III Space Vehicle 04, GPS III Space Vehicle 05, Inspiration4, Ax-1, Nilesat 301 and three Starlink missions

The first stage booster to support this mission previously launched GPS III Space Vehicle 04, GPS III Space Vehicle 05, Inspiration4, Ax-1, Nilesat 301 and three Starlink missions

The first stage booster to support this mission previously launched GPS III Space Vehicle 04, GPS III Space Vehicle 05, Inspiration4, Ax-1, Nilesat 301 and three Starlink missions

The space-based Internet satellite constellation has more than 3,000 satellites broadcasting high-speed, low-latency broadband to customers in 38 different countries.

The Starlink network has over 400,000 subscribers worldwide and currently costs $110 per month with a one-time fee of $599 for equipment.

Falcon 9 is a reusable two-stage rocket that has successfully transported people and payloads into Earth’s orbit and beyond.

Its ease of use and lower cost are important components of Musk’s overall vision to enable humans to colonize Mars and become a multi-planetary species. The plan is to use SpaceX’s massive Starship rocket to transport large numbers of people to and from the Red Planet in the future.

In July, SpaceX expanded its Starlink Internet service to oceans, rivers and lakes.

Starlink Maritime is available and the company is targeting owners of superyachts, oil rigs and merchant ships as potential customers. The service has a $10,000 hardware fee for two “rugged” Starlink dishes, and the regular cost is $5,000 per month.

The space company also had about 150,000 daily users of its Starlink satellite Internet service in Ukraine within two months of activation in the war-torn country.

ELON MUSK’S SPACEX BRINGS BROADBAND INTERNET TO THE WORLD WITH ITS STARLINK CONSTELLATION OF SATELLITES

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched more than 3,000 of its “Starlink” space Internet satellites into orbit and hopes to have 30,000 in the air.

They form a constellation designed to provide low-cost broadband Internet service from low Earth orbit.

While satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Star Link is different. SpaceX said its goal is to provide high-speed, low-latency internet around the world, especially in remote areas.

Musk has previously said the company could provide three billion people who currently do not have access to the internet a cheap way to get online.

It will also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity reach the Red Planet and become multi-planetary is one of Musk’s long-cherished goals and what inspired him to start SpaceX.

Musk’s rival Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, also plans to launch a constellation of satellites into low Earth orbit to provide broadband access to remote areas, as part of his Project Kuiper.

However, astronomers have expressed concern about the light pollution and other interference caused by these satellite constellations.

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