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South Australian family on Today Show forced to ration food and fuel as cost of living crisis bites 

Young family forced to ration food, fuel and even skip showers after being turned down for 100 rental properties when landlord died as cost of living woes bite: ‘It doesn’t feel like Australia’

  • A SA family admits to rationing food and fuel over cost of living crisis
  • David Fairhead and Wynona Reilly live in a farm with no working stove
  • They have been turned down for 100 rentals and waive at least one meal a day
  • The couple sometimes can’t take their daughter to school because of fuel costs

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A young family said the cost of living has made Australia unrecognizable after being forced to ration food and fuel, and even be selective about when to wash their clothes.

David Fairhead and Wynona Reilly live with their daughter in an old farmhouse with no working stove in Kangarilla, southeast of Adelaide.

The couple tried desperately to find new housing but were turned down for nearly 100 rental properties after the death of their landlord.

David Fairhead and Wynona Reilly (both pictured) live in an old farmhouse with no working stove in Kangarilla, South Australia.  The family says they ration food and fuel to make ends meet

David Fairhead and Wynona Reilly (both pictured) live in an old farmhouse with no working stove in Kangarilla, South Australia. The family says they ration food and fuel to make ends meet

“It doesn’t feel like it should be like that in Australia,” Ms Reilly said in an interview with Today Show host Allison Langdon.

‘[This year], with the amount of financial burden that people suffer, it is too much. It’s really gotten out of hand,” Mr Fairhead added.

The family usually goes without at least one meal a day, forgoing essentials to feed their six-year-old daughter Savannah, who has autism.

“When we go to the shops, we miss things. My daughter is autistic so she has to eat certain things and, [it] the price in the store doesn’t matter, we’ll have to buy them so she has a variety of things to eat,” said Mrs. Reilly.

The couple is sometimes unable to drive their daughter to school because they cannot afford the exorbitant fuel costs and also fix mechanical problems with their car that they cannot afford.

They should also choose carefully when to wash their clothes to save money.

Mr Fairhead described the situation as ‘demotivating and demoralizing’.

1660698126 212 South Australian family on Today Show forced to ration food

1660698126 212 South Australian family on Today Show forced to ration food

The couple told Today Show host Allison Langdon that it “don’t feel like Australia” as they struggle to find affordable accommodation and afford basic necessities.

But the couple said they are just “one of thousands” of Australian families desperately struggling to afford basic necessities and shelter amid the cost of living.

Mr Fairhead, who is on welfare while recovering from an injury at work, is currently looking for work.

Mrs. Reilly has a health care allowance.

The couple said they were happily supported by close friends and family.

Prices for many staple groceries in Australia have risen, which is reflected in last month’s announcement that our inflation is at its highest level in two decades.

Floods on Australia’s east coast causing damage to crops, coupled with rising fuel costs from the bloody war in Ukraine, have dramatically increased Australia’s cost of living.

Data shows that the price of vegetables, fruit, bread, eggs, oils and margarines has risen in price in Australia since last year (pictured is a supermarket in Sydney)

Data shows that the price of vegetables, fruit, bread, eggs, oils and margarines has risen in price in Australia since last year (pictured is a supermarket in Sydney)

Data shows that the price of vegetables, fruit, bread, eggs, oils and margarines has risen in price in Australia since last year (pictured is a supermarket in Sydney)

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), vegetables, fruits, breakfast cereals, bread, eggs, oils, butter and margarines have risen sharply in price over the past year.

Aussies are also paying some of the highest fuel prices in the world as a result of the crisis.

The cost of petrol is expected to rise further as the government has ruled out extending the fuel tax cut, which expires on September 28.

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