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Russian base is blown up after Ukrainian hacker tricks Putin's troops into giving position away

Russian base blown up after Ukrainian hacker creates fake social media profiles of attractive women and misleads Putin’s troops into giving away position

  • Nikita Knysh, 30, and his group of 30 hackers carried out the hack last month
  • They sent the images of the Russian military base to the Ukrainian soldiers
  • It was attacked several days later and explosions sounded in the area
  • Explosions were confirmed in an interview by the mayor of Melitopol, Ivan Fedorov

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A Russian base was blown up after a Ukrainian hacker created fake social media profiles of attractive women and tricked Putin’s troops into revealing their position.

Speaking with the Financial timesNikita Knysh, from Kharkiv, who is an IT professional, explained that he wanted to use his hacking skills to help his country beat Russia and founded the group Hackyourmom.

Nikita, 30, and his group of 30 hackers defrauded Russian soldiers stationed in Melitopol using fake social media accounts and had soldiers send pictures of them at the front.

The hackers used the footage to find out that the Russians were at a military base near Melitopol in southern Ukraine.

After the information was sent to the Ukrainian army, the base was attacked a few days later and explosions were heard Ukrainian Pravda.

The mayor of Melitopol, Ivan Fedorov, confirmed the news on Telegram.

The hackers used the footage to find out that the Russians were at a military base near Melitopol in southern Ukraine.  After the information was sent to the Ukrainian army, the base was attacked several days later and explosions were heard, Ukraine's Pravda said.  Pictured: A light from an explosion in the sky

The mayor of Melitopol, Ivan Fedorov, confirmed the news on Telegram.  Pictured: View of the sky as the loud explosions were heard

The mayor of Melitopol, Ivan Fedorov, confirmed the news on Telegram.  Pictured: View of the sky as the loud explosions were heard

The hackers used the footage to find out that the Russians were at a military base near Melitopol in southern Ukraine. After the information was sent to the Ukrainian army, the base was attacked several days later and explosions were heard, Ukraine’s Pravda said. Pictured: A light from an explosion in the sky

Nikita, 30, and his group of 30 hackers defrauded Russian soldiers stationed in Melitopol using fake social media accounts and had soldiers send pictures of them at the front.  File photo shows Russian soldiers at an exercise this week

Nikita, 30, and his group of 30 hackers defrauded Russian soldiers stationed in Melitopol using fake social media accounts and had soldiers send pictures of them at the front.  File photo shows Russian soldiers at an exercise this week

Nikita, 30, and his group of 30 hackers defrauded Russian soldiers stationed in Melitopol using fake social media accounts and had soldiers send pictures of them at the front. File photo shows Russian soldiers at an exercise this week

He said: ‘Another explosive night in Melitopol and the village of Myrne in the Melitopol district. At 1 a.m. residents of all neighborhoods heard loud explosions.

“The first was so strong that the windows in some houses shook and the plaster fell. We await confirmation that Ukraine’s armed forces destroyed another occupying base with jewel-like precision strikes. The enemy will never have peace on our land.’

Fedorov later said: “In Melitopol, one of the largest enemy bases on the territory of the ‘Actovolorlit’ factory was destroyed.”

Footage showed the sounds and bright lights of the explosions near the base.

Knysh said of the hacking that led to the alleged attack: “The Russians, they always want f**k. They send a lot of s**t to ‘girls’ to prove they are warriors.’

And another team member on Hackyourmom, named only Maxim, said after the attack they thought, ‘My first thought was: I’m effective, I can help my country.

“Then, I realized, I want more of this – I want to find more bases, over and over.

It comes as a cyber feud rages between Russia and Ukraine, with hackers launching ferocious attacks on both sides.

When the invasion first began in February, Ukraine’s Digital Affairs Minister asked citizens to join the country’s “IT army.” Business Insider.

Hackers were used to display anti-war messages during Russian military Victory Day celebrations in May.

Other hacks have also been carried out by Knysh and his team, including leaking the databases of Russian military contractors.

They also showed clips of Ukrainian civilian victims after they cheated on Russian TV stations.

Knysh said it “felt like a fight” to him, adding that fraudsters can be used as a weapon against your enemy if you don’t have money, brilliant software or hacks.

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