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Rolls-Royce will only make electric cars from 2030: luxury is also electrified

That car manufacturers are putting the batteries to electrify their catalog is no secret. In fact, it is something that they will have to do sooner or later while from 2035 gasoline and diesel cars are condemned to disappear in the European Union.

Car firms have been announcing their plans to switch to electric cars for a couple of years and the last to arrive has been the English Rolls-Royce, which has confirmed that from 2030 it will only produce electric cars. Thus, the European Union is five years ahead. Interestingly, Rolls-Royce doesn’t have any electric cars on the roads yet.

Luxury is also going to be electric

Spectre.
Spectre.

As explained by Rolls-Royce, from 2030 it will only manufacture electric cars. The first vehicle in this category will be the Specter, which is not yet official. It is expected that the first models are delivered in the fourth quarter of 2023.

Rather little is known about this car. In fact, Rolls-Royce has not disclosed any specifications or technical details. What it has shown are some photos in which the camouflaged car appears. Its shape is somewhat reminiscent of the Rolls-Royce Wraith, but we will not leave doubts until later. We do know that the company intends to put it through a very extensive development program that includes 2.5 million test kilometers.

Spectre
Spectre

It is striking that BMW, the firm’s parent company, has not yet set a date for the end of combustion cars, beyond which they expect from 2030 half of its production is electric cars. Mini, meanwhile, aims to be fully electric by the end of the decade.

Other luxury-related brands that have confirmed their plans to move to full electric They are Jaguar (2025), Bentley (2030) and Mercedes Benz (2030 if market conditions are favorable). Other brands, such as Ferrari and Lamborghini, are not so convinced and want the European Union to make an exception with their super sports cars.

Via | CNBC