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Princess Eugenie disembarks for ‘Art Is Freedom’ exhibition

Princess Eugenie has disembarked in London to visit an art exhibition of survivors of modern slavery.

The Queen’s granddaughter, 31, who welcomed her first child, August, with husband Jack Brooksbank in February this year, appeared to be doing business in a black and white ensemble for the outing.

Embracing an autumnal style, the royal wore a black dress paired with a checkered cardigan on arrival at Paternoster Square, next to St Paul’s Cathedral.

She attended the ‘Art Is Freedom’ exhibition with Julia de Boinville, co-founder of their charity The Anti-Slavery Collective.

Princess Eugenie (pictured center) disembarked in London to visit an art exhibition of survivors of modern slavery

Princess Eugenie (pictured center) disembarked in London to visit an art exhibition of survivors of modern slavery

The Queen's granddaughter (pictured), 31, welcomed her first child, August, in February this year with husband Jack Brooksbank

The Queen's granddaughter (pictured), 31, welcomed her first child, August, in February this year with husband Jack Brooksbank

She seemed to mean business in a black and white ensemble for the outing

She seemed to mean business in a black and white ensemble for the outing

The Queen’s granddaughter (pictured), 31, who welcomed her first child, August, with husband Jack Brooksbank in February of this year, appeared to mean business for the outing in a black-and-white ensemble

The exhibition centering on the theme of ‘hope’ includes photography and mixed media pieces of men, women and children who have experienced modern slavery.

The survivors completed a series of workshops taught by volunteer professional artists, and their pieces were curated by the crisis organization Hestia.

The exhibition, which opened on October 18 on Slavery Day, aims to raise awareness about the issue and help the public recognize the signs of modern slavery.

Hestia, which supports more than 2,200 adult victims of modern slavery and 1,200 dependent children each year, said in its latest report that there are at least 5,000 children of modern slavery victims in the UK and many more may be lost in the system.

Embracing an autumnal style, the royal wore a black dress paired with a checkered cardigan on arrival at Paternoster Square, next to St Paul's Cathedral

Embracing an autumnal style, the royal wore a black dress paired with a checkered cardigan on arrival at Paternoster Square, next to St Paul's Cathedral

Embracing an autumnal style, the royal wore a black dress paired with a checkered cardigan on arrival at Paternoster Square, next to St Paul’s Cathedral

Eugenie (pictured) attended the 'Art Is Freedom' exhibition with Julia de Boinville, co-founder of their charity The Anti-Slavery Collective

Eugenie (pictured) attended the 'Art Is Freedom' exhibition with Julia de Boinville, co-founder of their charity The Anti-Slavery Collective

Eugenie (pictured) attended the ‘Art Is Freedom’ exhibition with Julia de Boinville, co-founder of their charity The Anti-Slavery Collective

Eugenie, who studied art history at university and is director of art gallery Hauser & Wirth, founded her own initiative The Anti-Slavery Collective in 2017 with friend Julia de Boinville.

In a message about charity Instagram account on Wednesday, the duo revealed the story of how the organization started.

The caption read: ‘We met on the bus on our way to a school trip and knew right away that this was just the beginning of a lifelong friendship and adventure!

Eugenie, who studied art history at university and is director of art gallery Hauser & Wirth, founded her own initiative The Anti-Slavery Collective in 2017, together with friend Julia de Boinville (pictured together).

Eugenie, who studied art history at university and is director of art gallery Hauser & Wirth, founded her own initiative The Anti-Slavery Collective in 2017, together with friend Julia de Boinville (pictured together).

Eugenie, who studied art history at university and is director of art gallery Hauser & Wirth, founded her own initiative The Anti-Slavery Collective in 2017, together with friend Julia de Boinville (pictured together).

The exhibition (photo) revolving around the theme of 'hope' includes photography and mixed media pieces of men, women and children who have experienced modern slavery

The exhibition (photo) revolving around the theme of 'hope' includes photography and mixed media pieces of men, women and children who have experienced modern slavery

The exhibition (photo) revolving around the theme of ‘hope’ includes photography and mixed media pieces of men, women and children who have experienced modern slavery

The survivors completed a series of workshops taught by volunteer professional artists, and their pieces were curated by the crisis organization Hestia.  Pictured, the royal at the exhibition

The survivors completed a series of workshops taught by volunteer professional artists, and their pieces were curated by the crisis organization Hestia.  Pictured, the royal at the exhibition

The survivors completed a series of workshops taught by volunteer professional artists, and their pieces were curated by the crisis organization Hestia. Pictured, the royal at the exhibition

“After following each other around the world, then to Newcastle University, and into our careers. In 2012 we went on a trip to Kolkata, India.

“Here we visited an organization called Women’s Interlink Foundation and became aware of modern slavery for the first time. Aloka Mitra, the founder of Women’s Interlink, rescues girls from modern slavery, gives them a home and teaches them a simple professional skill: fabric printing.

“We were shocked to discover the extent to which slavery still exists. In fact, there are more enslaved people today than at any other time in history and at any time someone is being trafficked within a mile of where you live.

The exhibition, which opened on October 18 on Slavery Day, aims to raise awareness about the issue and help the public recognize the signs of modern slavery.  Pictured, Eugenie, left

The exhibition, which opened on October 18 on Slavery Day, aims to raise awareness about the issue and help the public recognize the signs of modern slavery.  Pictured, Eugenie, left

The exhibition, which opened on October 18 on Slavery Day, aims to raise awareness about the issue and help the public recognize the signs of modern slavery. Pictured, Eugenie, left

In a post (pictured) on The Anti-Slavery Collective's Instagram account on Wednesday, Eugenie and Julia revealed the story of how the organization began

In a post (pictured) on The Anti-Slavery Collective's Instagram account on Wednesday, Eugenie and Julia revealed the story of how the organization began

In a post (pictured) on The Anti-Slavery Collective’s Instagram account on Wednesday, Eugenie and Julia revealed the story of how the organization began

“We often associate slavery with chains and shackles, but modern slavery is a hidden crime that is often difficult to detect.

‘For the next five years we trained ourselves. We became obsessive researchers, visiting anyone who could help us expand our knowledge; from policy makers, law enforcement agencies and academics to NGOs, social workers and survivors.

“We asked everyone we met, ‘What can two young girls like us do to help?’ Without fail, the answer has always been awareness. So this became our mission. In 2017 we proudly launched The Anti-Slavery Collective.”

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