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Nurse shares the most common things people say and do right before they die, often seeing dead loved ones

A nurse at the hospice has shared the most common things people say and just before they die, and she revealed that they often claim to see their dead relatives.

Julie McFadden, a registered nurse from Los Angeles, California, said her patients often tell her that they see their loved ones who have already passed away in their final moments, and that their deceased loved ones tell them things like, “We’re coming. to get you soon” or “Don’t worry, we’ll help you.”

Julie has worked in hospice care for over five years, having spent more than ten years as an ICU nurse. She recently shared her knowledge and experience on TikTok, under the username @hospicenursejulie, and she has gained over 430,000 followers and 3.6 million likes.

Hospice care is a form of healthcare that focuses on helping terminally ill patients reduce their pain and suffering, and meet their emotional and spiritual needs at the end of their lives.

Julie is often close to death because of her job and she has decided to dispel some misconceptions about what happens to people’s bodies and minds when they die.

A hospice nurse has shared the most common things people say and do right before they die, revealing that they often claim to see their dead relatives in their final moments.

A hospice nurse has shared the most common things people say and do right before they die, revealing that they often claim to see their dead relatives in their final moments.

Julie McFadden, a registered nurse from Los Angeles, California, said her patients often tell her they see their loved ones who have already passed away just before they die

Julie McFadden, a registered nurse from Los Angeles, California, said her patients often tell her they see their loved ones who have already passed away just before they die

Julie McFadden, a registered nurse from Los Angeles, California, said her patients often tell her they see their loved ones who have already passed away just before they die

She said it happens so often that they put it in the “educational packs they give to patients and their loved ones,” but she can’t explain why this happens.

According to the nurse, it is common for dying patients to see their “dead relatives, dead friends or old pets that have passed away” in the last weeks of their lives.

She said it happens so often that they put it in their “educational packages that they give to patients and their loved ones,” but she can’t explain why this is happening.

‘This happens so often that we put it in our educational packs that we give to patients and their families so that they understand what is going on. But we don’t know why it happens and we can’t explain it,” she said.

“It usually happens a month or so before the patient dies. They begin to see dead relatives, dead friends, old pets that have passed away – ghosts, angels, visiting them.

“Only they can see and hear them. Sometimes it’s through a dream and sometimes they can physically see them and basically ask us, “Do you see what I see?”

Julie explained that the patients are ‘usually not afraid’, but rather ‘comforted’ by it.

She added: “They’re usually not scared, it’s usually very reassuring to them and they say they’ll send a message like, ‘We’ll come get you soon,’ or ‘Don’t worry, we’ll help you.’

“Most people love this, they’re very comforted by it, it’s not scary for them. But yeah, we can’t explain it and it happens all the time.’

Julie said the patients are 'usually not afraid', but that they are actually very 'comforted' by it and their deceased loved ones tell them things like: 'Don't worry, we will help you'

Julie said the patients are 'usually not afraid', but that they are actually very 'comforted' by it and their deceased loved ones tell them things like: 'Don't worry, we will help you'

Julie said the patients are ‘usually not afraid’, but that they are actually very ‘comforted’ by it and their deceased loved ones tell them things like: ‘Don’t worry, we will help you’

She also revealed that the most common thing people say right before they die is, “I love you,” and that they often call out to their mom or dad.

The woman has worked in hospice care for more than five years.  She recently shared her knowledge and experience on TikTok under the username @hospicenursejulie

The woman has worked in hospice care for more than five years.  She recently shared her knowledge and experience on TikTok under the username @hospicenursejulie

The woman has worked in hospice care for more than five years. She recently shared her knowledge and experience on TikTok under the username @hospicenursejulie

When someone asked Julie if she thought it was a hallucination, she said she didn’t, because the patients are normally “quite alert and oriented.”

“I don’t know what it is,” she continued. “It doesn’t seem like a hallucination to me, because the people who say this are usually quite alert and oriented, they’re usually lucid.

“It’s not like they say a lot of crazy things that don’t make sense. They are usually functional and logical and ask me, “Why do I see my dead mother, do you see her?”

“I’ve seen hallucinations and what we’re talking about here isn’t. But I do not know.’

She also revealed that the most common thing people say right before they die is, “I love you,” and that they often call out to their mother or father.

The woman wanted people to know that death is not normally painful, but instead called it a very “peaceful and natural” process because “our bodies are built to die.”

“Our bodies are really built to survive most of birth, and they’re built to die. When someone dies of natural causes in a hospice, the body knows it,” she explained.

“The body begins to engage its regular mechanism built in when a person approaches death. It will, for the most part, stop eating and drinking and sleep a lot more.

“The body began to prepare itself and help the person have a more peaceful, natural death.”

She noted that while there are certain diseases that cause pain or discomfort, normally death itself does not hurt.

“Now there are certain diseases that people die from that can cause pain or discomfort, so we, as hospices, will help with that, and those symptoms,” she said.

‘But that’s because of the disease, it’s not because of death or dying itself. We’ve found time and time again that the less we mess with the natural dying process, the more peaceful death usually is.

“People believe that death equals pain, that dying is painful. And this just isn’t true. The disease you may die from, which can be painful and cause pain. But the actual death is not painful.’

The nurse wants people to know that death is not normally painful, but instead she called it a very 'peaceful and natural' process

The nurse wants people to know that death is not normally painful, but instead she called it a very 'peaceful and natural' process

The nurse wants people to know that death is not normally painful, but instead she called it a very ‘peaceful and natural’ process

She noted that while there are certain diseases that cause pain or discomfort, normally death itself doesn’t hurt because the “body is built to die”

She said changes in breathing, changes in skin color, terminal discharge and fever are normal just before a person dies

She said changes in breathing, changes in skin color, terminal discharge and fever are normal just before a person dies

She said changes in breathing, changes in skin color, terminal discharge and fever are normal just before a person dies

She also revealed that there are four things that often happen right before someone dies, namely: changes in breathing, changes in skin color, terminal discharge and fever.

She explained, “When you’re in the active dying phase, which is a few hours or a few days before someone dies while you’re in hospice, sometimes your body loses the ability to maintain its core temperature. You may run a fever or become very cold or hot.

Breathing patterns change towards the end of life during the active dying phase, usually a few hours or a few days before death.

“Most families think this indicates something is wrong, but nine times out of ten it isn’t.”

While speaking with The sunJulie said the best part of her job is “educating patients and families about death,” and that she hopes to do the same through her TikTok videos.

“The best part of my job is to educate patients and families about death and dying and to support them emotionally and physically,” she said.

“Also helping them understand what to expect is another part of my job as a hospice nurse.

“I want to normalize death by educating people about it. I went home to visit my family, and my two nieces were on TikTok making dance videos.

“Later I went on TikTok to see their dances. This gave me the idea to start my own TikTok about death and dying, four days later I did it and it started.’

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