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North Carolina woman, 50, and husband, 61, welcome first child after egg donation and IVF

A 50-year-old woman became a mother for the first time — and her 61-year-old husband a full-time father — after giving birth to a girl via cesarean section earlier this fall.

Susie and Tony Troxler of High Point, North Carolina had been trying to conceive since they married 13 years ago, but had no luck for over a decade — but after transitioning to egg donation and IVF, Susie gave birth to Lily Antonia Troxler on September 29.

“It was so surreal,” Susie, a psychologist, said in a Cone Health press release. “Everything had come together in that moment. It’s hard to wrap our heads around – we’re no longer just husband and wife, we’re ‘mama’ and ‘daddy’.’

Susie, 50, and Tony Troxler, 61, of High Point, North Carolina welcomed Lily Antonia Troxler via a planned cesarean section on Sept. 29

Susie, 50, and Tony Troxler, 61, of High Point, North Carolina welcomed Lily Antonia Troxler via a planned cesarean section on Sept. 29

They have been trying to conceive since they got married 13 years ago.  They tried, of course, because 'when we were growing up, nobody spoke or discussed IVF'

They have been trying to conceive since they got married 13 years ago.  They tried, of course, because 'when we were growing up, nobody spoke or discussed IVF'

They have been trying to conceive since they got married 13 years ago. They tried, of course, because ‘when we were growing up, nobody spoke or discussed IVF’

Susie was in his late thirties and Tony in his late forties when they married, and they tried to have a baby quickly, assuming it wouldn’t be a problem.

“When we got married, we just assumed we were going to get pregnant, and then it didn’t happen,” she said. Good morning America.

“But we’re both very old-fashioned, and growing up, nobody even talked about IVF” [in-vitro fertilization]. It wasn’t even a thing.’

She never even discussed it with a doctor until three years ago, when she went to a new OBGYN for a checkup — and was asked a question she’d never been asked before.

“Towards the end of my appointment, Dr. Harraway-Smith asked, ‘Is there anything else?’ she recalls. “If she hadn’t asked that question, this baby probably wouldn’t have been here.”

At a checkup with a new OBGYN three years ago, she was asked if she had any other questions and expressed her desire to conceive

At a checkup with a new OBGYN three years ago, she was asked if she had any other questions and expressed her desire to conceive

At a checkup with a new OBGYN three years ago, she was asked if she had any other questions and expressed her desire to conceive

She and Tony started IVF and then switched to egg donation when they had no viable embryos

She and Tony started IVF and then switched to egg donation when they had no viable embryos

She and Tony started IVF and then switched to egg donation when they had no viable embryos

“I was disappointed to hear her say no one had ever questioned them or given them fertility options,” said Dr. Carolyn Harraway-Smith.

dr. Harraway-Smith knew that because of Susie’s age, they had a “short time” for a pregnancy to occur, so she sent her to a reproductive endocrinologist.

That doctor diagnosed fibroids, muscle tumors on the wall of her uterus that are usually benign. Susie had surgery to remove them, but was still told she would not be able to conceive naturally.

So they tried IVF but were unable to produce a viable embryo. They then moved on to egg donation, with the first embryo transfer in late 2019 – but sadly it didn’t last.

The pandemic put their plans on hold, but in February of this year they transferred their last viable embryo — and it worked.

They describe being new parents as 'surreal' and insist: 'We knew it would happen, however it would happen'

They describe being new parents as 'surreal' and insist: 'We knew it would happen, however it would happen'

They describe being new parents as ‘surreal’ and insist: ‘We knew it would happen, however it would happen’

“Children come when they need to come, regardless of the age of the parents.  We see it as it is as it was intended.  She's our miracle baby,

“Children come when they need to come, regardless of the age of the parents.  We see it as it is as it was intended.  She's our miracle baby,

“Children come when they need to come, regardless of the age of the parents. We see it as it is as it was intended. She’s our miracle baby,” Susie said

Susie had a “pretty quiet” pregnancy, ending in a scheduled cesarean section on September 29, during which she hummed a gospel song.

“We knew we would eventually have children,” Tony said in the press release. ‘We wouldn’t give up. We had that faith. We dreamed of her. We knew how it was going to happen, that it was going to happen.

“Even now I find myself just staring at her,” he added to GMA. “She had me wrapped around her little finger before she was born.”

They call Lily their “little warrior princess” and say she’s already smiling.

“It’s really, really, really surreal,” Susie said. “I had been single, I was a wife and now the idea of ​​becoming a mom has still not sunk in I think.”

‘I believe that children come when they need to come, regardless of the age of the parents. We see it as it is as it was intended. She’s our miracle baby,” she added.

Is it ever too late to get pregnant? How Pregnancy And Fertility Change With Age

Women are born with a set number of eggs, and this number increases as a woman ages.

According to the American College of Obstetricians and GynecologistsWomen are most fertile from their late teens through their late twenties. Healthy people in their twenties and thirties have a one in four chance of getting pregnant during one menstrual cycle.

Fertility begins to decline for women at age 30, and the decline accelerates in a woman’s mid-thirties. Medically, 35 and older is considered advanced maternal age, and women are at greater risk of miscarriage and stillbirth.

By age 40, women have only a one in ten chance of getting pregnant in a single menstrual cycle. Getting pregnant naturally from the age of 45 is unlikely for most women.

Age can affect fertility in several ways. In addition to having fewer eggs, women are also at increased risk for problems such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis as they age.

As women age, pregnancy also carries risks for more complications for both mother and child.

Women have a higher risk of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia. There is also an increased risk of birth defects due to missing, damaged, or extra chromosomes.

While the risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is only 1 in 1480 by age 20 and 1 in 940 by age 30, it goes to 1 in 85 for women by age 50 and 1 in 35 for women at age 45.

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