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Mom-of-one reveals how her boyfriend secretly took nude photos of her while she was sleeping

A mum of one has revealed she will ‘never trust a man again’ after her boyfriend secretly took explicit nude photos of her sleeping, showering and getting dressed.

Lucy Lear, 24, from Devon, began dating Dale Bastin, 26, in 2013, welcoming a daughter to him in 2015. After a brief breakup, the couple got back together and planned to move in.

But in December 2019, the student nurse was devastated to discover on his phone a stash of more than 30 photos of her naked body, taken secretly over a three-year period.

She called the police and Bastin was charged with voyeurism in April 2020.

In July 2021, he pleaded guilty to five counts of voyeurism and was given a six-month prison sentence, an 18-month suspension, 100 hours of unpaid community work and 20 days of rehabilitation activities.

He was also placed on the sex offenders register for seven years, ordered to pay £500 in costs and banned from any further contact with Lucy.

After waiving her legal right to anonymity, the student nurse told The sun: ‘I loved Dale Bastin, but after what he did to me, I don’t think I’ll ever trust a man again.’

Lucy Lear, 24, from Devon, revealed she will 'never trust a man again' after her boyfriend secretly took explicit nude photos of her sleeping, showering and getting dressed

Lucy Lear, 24, from Devon, revealed she will ‘never trust a man again’ after her boyfriend secretly took explicit nude photos of her sleeping, showering and getting dressed

Lucy said she was a 16-year-old in love when she first got together with Bastin, and felt like she was “the luckiest girl in the world” going out with him.

After welcoming their daughter Grace in 2015, Lucy moved into her own home, but Bastin “wasn’t fully committed.”

Determined to give her daughter a good life, Lucy began training as a nurse and eventually she and Bastin broke up.

In time, he said he “wanted to be a real family” and the couple reunited and made plans to move in together.

However, everything changed when she looked through his phone one evening while they were watching TV together.

She said: ‘A photo immediately caught my attention – it was a naked ass.

Lucy said she was a 16-year-old in love when she first got together with Bastin, and felt like “the luckiest girl in the world” going out with him (pictured)

“But it had nothing to do with another woman—it was my naked ass sticking out from under my duvet.

Trembling, I opened the folder and clicked through the photos. There were over 30 images of me. Judging by the decor, I know a few more than three years old.’

She discovered that some of the photos had been taken while she was sleeping naked in bed, while others had been sneaked through the shower curtain while she was washing.

In another, she was bent over naked to get clothes from a drawer.

She described how some of the photos taken were “extremely explicit close-ups of her genitals” and how her boyfriend “pulled her underwear aside while she was sleeping” to take the photos.

She told him to leave, puking in horror, before meeting him the next day to confront him. She said he “couldn’t explain why he did it.”

Lucy was shocked to discover that some nude photos had been taken while she was sleeping in bed, while others had been sneaked through the shower curtain while she was washing.

Lucy was shocked to discover that some nude photos had been taken while she was sleeping in bed, while others had been sneaked through the shower curtain while she was washing.

Lucy was shocked to discover that some nude photos had been taken while she was sleeping in bed, while others had been sneaked through the shower curtain while she was washing.

Later that day, she called the police, who she called the situation “a gray area.”

The mother of one was later called by a member of the domestic and sexual assault team and made a statement to police.

Four months later, in April 2020, Dale was charged with voyeurism and pleaded not guilty.

Lucy was “tormented” by nightmares and diagnosed with PTSD, before Dale finally confessed to the crime in July 2021 and pleaded guilty to five counts of voyeurism.

Lucy called the sentence “pathetic” and added: “What Dale has done has changed my life forever and I think he should be behind bars.”

Meanwhile, she said it now “breaks her heart” that her daughter is “growing up without her father.”

The number of cases of exposure and voyeurism has increased by 59%, but police prosecution has almost halved in six years

Police prosecutions for cases of exposure and voyeurism have nearly halved in six years, while cases have risen by a staggering 59 percent, The Mail on Sunday revealed.

The shocking numbers reveal the scale of crime plaguing women and girls across the country.

But despite the huge increase in the number of cases, the police have prosecuted far fewer suspects since 2014.

Officers have been criticized for taking the crime less seriously in the wake of the conviction of police officer Wayne Couzens after it was revealed that he had previously made himself public on a number of occasions.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct is investigating the police’s failure to properly record flash charges against Couzens while he served with the Kent Police Force in 2015 and also three days before he raped and murdered 33-year-old Sarah Everard.

Campaigners have put the troops’ stance on the crimes to the test with radio host Emma Ball saying she was “laughed at” by officers after telling them a man she now believed Couzens had flashed her in 2008. .

Home Office data, analyzed by the Mail on Sunday, shows that since 2014, prosecution for exposure and voyeurism has fallen from 1,047 nationally to 594.

In 2016, the number of prosecutions was still maintained at 1,023, but by 2018 they had fallen to 721 and continued to decline until last year.

At the same time, reported violations rose sharply from 6,420 in 2013-14 to 10,203 in March to this year.

Victims Commissioner Dame Vera Baird denounced the police for the lack of prosecution and called for cases of exposure and voyeurism to be treated “seriously”.

She said: “Indecent exposure and voyeurism are serious crimes that should be recognized as a red flag about a man’s approach to women.

“Victims should be treated seriously and the police should investigate and make arrests.

“It is unforgivable that the figures from Mail on Sunday show that the number of complaints has almost doubled, but prosecutions have almost halved.

“Victims report crimes which, as we have seen recently, can lead to rape and worse, but encounter a blank wall.”

Findings from the Department of the Interior previously showed that cuts in the number of officers from 2010, with more than 20,000 lost nationally, contributed to a sharp rise in crime from 2014.

Police pointed out that rates for offenses related to exposure and voyeurism are above the national average.

Deputy Chief Constable Maggie Blyth, head of the National Police Chiefs’ Council on Violence Against Women and Girls, said: “Police are taking these reports very seriously, are investigating and working with the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to reach a joint decision.” to take on the charge and prosecute if there is evidence to do so.

‘One of my top priorities in combating violence against women and girls is to significantly improve the quality of investigations and the results of investigations in the police.

“We know that these types of offenses can be a precursor to other sex crimes and so the police will use risk assessments to measure the risk levels of offenders and help determine what early action can be taken to stop them.”

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