Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Middle-class Brits go vegetarian five days a week

Middle-class Britons are cutting meat and following a ‘climate diet’ to reduce their carbon footprint, a new report from Waitrose has revealed.

Dubbed the ‘new 5:2 diet’ — a reference to a popular weight-loss method where people diet just two days a week — environmentally conscious Brits go vegetarian five days a week and treat themselves to meat on weekends.

But it’s not just reducing meat consumption to be more green, Waitrose shoppers are also looking for other ways to be more environmentally friendly with their diets, including minimizing food waste by donating excess food and not buying groceries that come in handy. excess packaging are packed.

Middle-class Britons are dumping meat and adopting a 'climate diet' in a bid to reduce their carbon footprint, a new report from Waitrose has revealed (stock image)

Middle-class Britons are dumping meat and adopting a ‘climate diet’ in a bid to reduce their carbon footprint, a new report from Waitrose has revealed (stock image)

Nearly 70 percent of Waitrose’s customers said reducing their climate footprint was ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ important.

Over the year, shoppers focused on what else we can do to regenerate the environment.

At the start of the year, shoppers stopped buying sandwiches because we loved making home-cooked meals while working from home.

The report also found that Britain has become a country of roommates as we have fallen in love with our homes again and rediscovered the joy of intimate dinners.

Shoppers stopped buying take-away sandwiches at the start of the year as we lovingly made homemade feasts while working from home (stock image)

Shoppers stopped buying take-away sandwiches at the start of the year as we lovingly made homemade feasts while working from home (stock image)

Shoppers stopped buying take-away sandwiches at the start of the year as we lovingly made homemade feasts while working from home (stock image)

Although we are allowed to socialize again, the country embraces staying at home and receiving loved ones.

What did Brits eat this year? From canned fish to nostaglic dessert The Waitrose Food & Drink report reveals it all…

• Canned fish – Sales of mackerel and anchovies increased by 17 percent in August 2021

• Searches for barbecued watermelon recipes on Waitrose.com increased 65 percent in August

• Nostalgic desserts – searches for recipes for Knickerbocker glory on waitrose.com are up 171 percent this year

• Herbs and spices sales grew 41 percent this year, with specialty salts proving to be the top performers

• Sushi – Sales were up 54 percent, while sushi mats were up 57 percent and nori sales were up 56 percent

The drinks that dominated our drinks cabinets are:

• Champagne sales are up 40 percent year-over-year, while sales of magnums and larger bottles are up 88 percent

• Rosé wine continues to dominate our wine shelves and roséfizz sales are up 47 percent

• Cream liqueurs have become popular all year round (not just for Christmas)

Products that we have removed from our shopping list include:

• Lovage – Bristol alcoholic liqueur (deleted)

• Ironing water sales dropped by a fifth

• Sales of tights decreased by 31% compared to 2019

• Sales of on-the-go sandwiches decreased by 45 percent between January and March compared to 2020

Champagne sales are up 40 percent year-over-year as customers spend more money on small treats as we come out of the pandemic.

Over the year we also moved our kitchens outside – one in five respondents said they had invested in a new barbecue, while one in ten said they had installed an outdoor bar.

The report on how our eating and drinking habits have evolved over the past 12 months also shows how social media has influenced our shopping lists.

Platforms like Instagram and TikTok have boosted sales of everything from feta and tortillas to pesto and potatoes as a result of viral food trends.

The TikTok trend of making pasta chips at home contributed to a 400 percent increase in airfryer sales at John Lewis.

The way Brits shop has also changed, with a quarter of Waitrose shoppers shopping online for the first time in 2021, while the number of people buying food every day has doubled in a year.

These shopping trends – increased frequency and the continued growth of online – will only accelerate in the future.

A third of those surveyed have used on-demand food delivery apps during the pandemic.

Over the year we expanded our partnership with Deliveroo to 150 locations; our report’s Deliveroo map reveals the country’s most popular products for fast home delivery (they’re not what you might think).

James Bailey, Executive Director at Waitrose, told FEMAIL: “Over the past 19 months we have fallen in love with our homes again.

“We have rediscovered the joy, creativity and togetherness that food brings into our households and many have embraced the inspiration we get from going to the stores to pick up our groceries.

“The majority of people we surveyed told us that the pandemic has fundamentally changed their view of the world: they are more aware of their mental and physical health, they enjoy the simple pleasures of life and they have importance of family and friends. ‘

Move over Nigella.. Brits are now going to TikTok for cooking tips

By Sean Poulter for the Daily Mail

Move over Jamie Oliver, Nigella and Delia as young Brits turn to TikTok for cooking tips.

The trend brings us dishes like pesto eggs, pasta chips, whipped cream lemonade, feta pasta and mozzarella donuts.

The TikTok clips are gaining millions of views from social media influencers such as Amy Wilichowski, chef Nick Di Giovanni and Marliyn La Jeunesse.

Pesto eggs are the latest food trend going viral on TikTok and Instagram after more than 1.4 million people watched registered dietitian Amy Wilichowski how frying eggs in pesto instead of olive oil is the secret to a delicious breakfast twist.  Pictured an attempt by Instagram users

Pesto eggs are the latest food trend going viral on TikTok and Instagram after more than 1.4 million people watched registered dietitian Amy Wilichowski how frying eggs in pesto instead of olive oil is the secret to a delicious breakfast twist.  Pictured an attempt by Instagram users

Pesto eggs are the latest food trend going viral on TikTok and Instagram after more than 1.4 million people watched registered dietitian Amy Wilichowski how frying eggs in pesto instead of olive oil is the secret to a delicious breakfast twist. Pictured an attempt by Instagram users

What will we eat in 2022?

A Nation of House Bodies

The post-pandemic economy will be a Homebody Economy as we have fallen in love with our home – and cooking again – over the past year.

The return of the intimate dinner

The lockdowns have made us more appreciative of friends and family, and there’s a new emphasis when it comes to dinner parties: it’s all about quality, not quantity.

The wide nature

Many of us have turned our gardens, patios or balconies into new entertainment areas. Our research found that nearly 40% of us have lit our barbecues more than they used to.

Regenerate our planet

Three quarters of our respondents have made more effort this year to avoid wasting food, while 77% are concerned about the amount of plastic in their grocery packaging.

social eating

Three quarters of all 18-24 year olds we surveyed looked to TikTok and Instagram for food inspiration during the lockdown, while one in 12 people across all age groups posted a photo of their food or their ‘tablescaped’ meal setting on social media — or sent a photo to a friend – in the day before our poll.

Products, flavors and trends that we can expect more of in 2022 include potato milk, umami, craft-prepared bottled cocktails and climatarism (a diet aimed at reducing your carbon footprint). Meanwhile, sustainability will continue to be central to people’s lives and homes

The trend has been identified by the Waitrose Food and Drink report, which charts changing flavors and sales.

Under this heading, the supermarket predicts the emergence of ‘potato milk’ as an alternative to dairy, as well as batched bottles of popular cocktails.

It also follows a rise in climatism, a diet aimed at reducing your carbon footprint, supporting eating seasonal local foods and omitting meat.

In addition, the report suggests that many people follow a 5:2 diet, where they eat meat just two days a week.

It has also been picked up that people want to have multiple Christmas lunches while sharing dinners or celebrations with friends and family.

Waitrose Executive Director James Bayley said: “TikTok and Instagram remain dazzling treasure troves of innovation, expression and joy when it comes to food and home cooking.

“Three-quarters of all 18- to 24-year-olds we surveyed told us they’ve looked to TikTok or Instagram for food inspiration in the past year.

“It has made the food world a wonderfully intimate place. For example, in South Korea a food trend can take off and within a day half a million people here are asking about the ingredient.

“Eating on these platforms is creative, exciting and fast moving.”

Waitrose said: ‘We know people are celebrating ‘Second Christmas’ with their friends because #Friendsmas has 16.2 million views on TikTok.”

Looking at sales trends, Waitrose saw a boom for canned fish, with mackerel and anchovy sales, for example, up 17 percent in August.

Searches for barbecued watermelon recipes on Waitrose.com rose 65 percent in August, while the figure for the recipe for Knickerbocker glory was up 171%.

Sushi sales are up 54 percent, while sales of herbs and spices are up 41 percent.

Products that we have removed from our shopping list include ironing water, an alcoholic lovage syrup, tights and ready-made sandwiches.

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