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MICAH RICHARDS: Patrick Vieira has ALL the traits to be the next Pep Guardiola, I have seen how he leads

The moments leading up to the 2011 FA Cup semi-final were tense and the Manchester City dressing room was filled with nervous energy.

Things weren’t the way they normally were and something had to happen before we headed to face Manchester United. Patrick Vieira climbed up. “Everyone quiet,” Patrick ordered.

Some of the boys looked at each other as if to say ‘what’s going on?’ but soon everything became clear. Patrick had been with us for 18 months; He was nearing the end of his playing career, but the fire still burned within him. He was about to show his distinguishing features.

Crystal Palace coach Patrick Vieira (pictured) has all the traits to be the next Pep Guardiola

Crystal Palace coach Patrick Vieira (pictured) has all the traits to be the next Pep Guardiola

Vieira (right) showed Sportsmail columnist Micah Richards his leadership skills in Man City

Vieira (right) showed Sportsmail columnist Micah Richards his leadership skills in Man City

Vieira (right) showed Sportsmail columnist Micah Richards his leadership skills in Man City

‘So many times we have been overlooked; They talk about us like a money club, put that noise aside, ‘he said. ‘You are the best players, but this is where you become great players and make a name for yourself. Don’t leave the court with regrets. If we leave everything out there, I promise you that you will win. ‘

You might have heard a pin drop as he spoke, but there was chaos when he finished. His speech made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up, I’ll remember him for the rest of my life. We went on to beat United 1-0 and then lifted the Cup a month later, beating Stoke by the same score.

I tell this story to give an idea of ​​the potential Patrick has now that he is a manager. He returns to City on Saturday in charge of Crystal Palace and if his coaching career continues to progress as I hope, I see no reason why his name would not at least be in the conversation as a possible successor to Pep Guardiola.

It’s true that Palace has only won one of their nine Premier League matches so far and so I can understand why some may question why I think Patrick has the credentials to be in the conversation of what is now one. of the most important jobs in world football.

Let me explain. I saw up close how he adapted when City put him in charge of the Under-23 squad. He wants his teams to push high on the pitch, but he also wants his defenders to be able to play from behind and that philosophy fits with the vision of the club.

However, there is much more than just one style of play. Patrick is someone you want to follow in battle. Sometimes when older players show up at the club, they don’t always get the respect they should from the younger members of the locker room, but that’s never the case for him at City.

If his career as a manager continues to progress as I hope, I see no reason why his name is not at least in the conversation as a possible successor to Pep Guardiola.

If his career as a manager continues to progress as I hope, I see no reason why his name is not at least in the conversation as a possible successor to Pep Guardiola.

If his career as a manager continues to progress as I hope, I see no reason why his name is not at least in the conversation as a possible successor to Pep Guardiola.

Patrick was Roberto Mancini’s first signing and his contribution in those early years is sometimes overlooked. He was absolutely horrible in practice, he never forgave you in one inning, but having him as a teammate was an education.

If you asked him to do something for you, he never let you down. So if he asked you to do something in return, you felt compelled to do the same. I read something about Eberechi Eze, the end of the Palace, saying that he was overwhelmed when he met Vieira and I understand what he means.

This is not just any footballer. Patrick, like Steven Gerrard on the Rangers, inspires immediate respect for all that he accomplished. Young players will now have grown up idolizing him, and just because of his reputation, they will want to walk through a brick wall for him.

He’s tough as a nail in a battle, but he’s also cool, calm and collected, and that attitude made a big impression on the likes of Khaldoon Al-Mubarak, City president, and Brian Marwood, City Football Group CEO of world football. , who were instrumental in giving him the opportunity to oversee Manchester City’s under-23 team.

Sometimes the best managerial appointments are those who know a club from the inside out before taking over. Look at Guardiola in Barcelona: His only experience before being introduced in 2008 was with Barça’s B team, but given what he had accomplished as a player, the role didn’t stop any surprises.

I understand, of course, that some will be skeptical of him and simply see how he was fired by Nice after a five-game losing streak last year.

Having spent time at the Etihad as an under-23 coach, he understands the philosophy of the club.

Having spent time at the Etihad as an under-23 coach, he understands the philosophy of the club.

Having spent time at the Etihad as an under-23 coach, he understands the philosophy of the club.

To that I would say that the landscape changed during that job and financial constraints meant that he had to sell his best players, one of whom was Allan Saint-Maximin to Newcastle.

When Palace named him at the back of that job, many judges would have considered them relegation candidates, especially since they had lost so many veteran players and Roy Hodgson’s steady hand was off the wheel.

Say what you want about Hodgson, but he guaranteed your survival.

Not for a minute did I consider the Palace a relegation candidate and nothing I have seen in these first three months has made me think that my instincts were wrong. Conor Gallagher, on loan from Chelsea, has caught my attention.

I just hope Palace turns these draws into wins, they should have beaten Arsenal and Brighton as there will come a time in the campaign when things will be more challenging and teams in the lower half may lose confidence when they don’t get results. .

However, the man who runs them will not lose confidence. Whatever happens at the Etihad on Saturday, Patrick Vieira will go places. Who knows? Someday your journey could bring you back to Manchester again.

NOT ONLY BLAME OLE

Much has been said after last Sunday’s remarkable game between Manchester United and Liverpool. If I’m honest, I’m still in shock from what I saw. There is nothing new to add about Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

My first column of the season, on August 14, was about how there were no excuses for him and he had to produce results. With every poor result since then, the pressure has only intensified. That will not change.

However, it is not fair that he is the only one to blame for everything that goes wrong. In these circumstances, players have to look at themselves and I noticed what Marcus Rashford said in the middle of the week about how he felt after the 5-0 win.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer shouldn't take all the blame for Manchester United's troubles, the players should also have a drink and I noticed what Marcus Rashford said midweek about how he was feeling.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer shouldn't take all the blame for Manchester United's troubles, the players should also have a drink and I noticed what Marcus Rashford said midweek about how he was feeling.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer shouldn’t take all the blame for Manchester United’s troubles, the players should also have a drink and I noticed what Marcus Rashford said midweek about how he was feeling.

I remember playing for Aston Villa when Liverpool, led by Jurgen Klopp, beat us 6-0 at Villa Park. I couldn’t sleep for three days after that and the frustration of being beaten so badly at home is intolerable.

All professional footballers are proud and the pride of every United player has been affected over the past six days.

They dare not repeat that performance against Tottenham on Saturday night. They owe everyone, especially their manager, to fix things.

MICAH’S … MAN OF THE WEEK

Who says the Carabao Cup means nothing? The expression on David Moyes’ face on Wednesday after West Ham knocked out Manchester City on penalties was priceless and continued his team’s excellent start to the campaign.

West Ham have tried many things over the past 10 years in an attempt to become a force, but Moyes is proving to be the coach they have longed for.

If West Ham wins the Carabao Cup, there would be no more deserved winner than David Moyes

If West Ham wins the Carabao Cup, there would be no more deserved winner than David Moyes

If West Ham wins the Carabao Cup, there would be no more deserved winner than David Moyes

He has put together talented players with hard work and his team is entertaining to watch.

Moyes is an excellent coach and those eight months at Manchester United will never define his career. If West Ham could go all the way in this competition, there would be no more worthy winner than him.

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