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Melissa Caddick investigation: Watch Anthony Koletti answer police questions about her disappearance

A police video shows the ‘relaxed and seemingly indifferent’ demeanor of Melissa Caddick’s husband Anthony Koletti the day after she went missing.

The clip of Mr Koletti calmly explaining what he knew to three NSW police officers around 12:30pm on Nov. 13 was presented as evidence during an inquest into her disappearance.

Apart from claims about Mr Koletti’s behaviour, the investigation also revealed that he impersonated her the day after she went missing and even falsely told friends he was at her home.

Koletti texted their cleaner from his wife’s phone to schedule an appointment and lied to her brother Adam Grimley and her friend Scott Little in messages, a court heard.

The inquest heard that Mr. Koletti told them he was at Caddick’s house, when in fact he hadn’t seen her all day.

He reported Caddick missing to police 28 hours after he said she left the house to go for a walk or run.

A fascinating police video shows the 'relaxed and seemingly indifferent' demeanor of Melissa Caddick's husband Anthony Koletti more than a day after she went missing.  His answers led to Koletti being initially considered a suspect (pictured, Mr. Koletti with NSW Police)

A fascinating police video shows the ‘relaxed and seemingly indifferent’ demeanor of Melissa Caddick’s husband Anthony Koletti more than a day after she went missing. His answers led to Koletti being initially considered a suspect (pictured, Mr. Koletti with NSW Police)

Koletti reported his wife missing to police 28 hours after he said she left the house to go for a walk or run

Koletti reported his wife missing to police 28 hours after he said she left the house to go for a walk or run

Koletti reported his wife missing to police 28 hours after he said she left the house to go for a walk or run

He told police that he slammed the front door loudly around 6 a.m. on November 12, indicating that his wife had left the family home, but had failed to report her at 11:45 a.m. the next day.

The inquest, at Lidcombe Coroners Court in Sydney, learned that her husband’s ‘conflicting’ statements to police contributed to his being suspected of being involved in her mysterious disappearance.

The officers who took Mr Koletti’s statement on Nov. 13, 2020, about the disappearance of his fraudster wife, said he changed his story and “lied” to them, the inquest learned.

Koletti was seen outside the NSW Coroner's Court in Lidcombe on Tuesday morning - a day after the inquest learned that police suspected him of playing a role in Melissa Caddick's disappearance during the early days of her disappearance.  Police later dismissed those suspicions and found that she is strongly believed to have committed suicide

Koletti was seen outside the NSW Coroner's Court in Lidcombe on Tuesday morning - a day after the inquest learned that police suspected him of playing a role in Melissa Caddick's disappearance during the early days of her disappearance.  Police later dismissed those suspicions and found that she is strongly believed to have committed suicide

Koletti was seen outside the NSW Coroner’s Court in Lidcombe on Tuesday morning – a day after the inquest learned that police suspected him of playing a role in Melissa Caddick’s disappearance during the early days of her disappearance. Police later dismissed those suspicions and found that she is strongly believed to have committed suicide

Barbara Grimley, Melissa Caddick's mother, arrives on the second day of the inquest into the fraudster's death

Barbara Grimley, Melissa Caddick's mother, arrives on the second day of the inquest into the fraudster's death

Barbara Grimley, Melissa Caddick’s mother, arrives on the second day of the inquest into the fraudster’s death

There is no suggestion that Mr. Koletti was involved in his wife’s disappearance, only that the court heard officers were initially suspicious.

The court also heard officers say he seemed much less upset than someone in his situation usually is.

“I woke up just before six and she was gone, I didn’t think anything of it at first,” he tells a female officer in the clip.

ASIC raided Caddick's home in Dover Heights on November 11, 2020 on suspicion that she had executed a Ponzi scheme that embezzled $30 million from investors, including her friends and family.

ASIC raided Caddick's home in Dover Heights on November 11, 2020 on suspicion that she had executed a Ponzi scheme that embezzled $30 million from investors, including her friends and family.

ASIC raided Caddick’s home in Dover Heights on November 11, 2020 on suspicion that she had executed a Ponzi scheme that embezzled $30 million from investors, including her friends and family.

Anthony Koletti arrives for the inquest into the death of Sydney fraudster Melissa Caddick at Lidcombe Coroners Court in Sydney, Monday 12 September

Anthony Koletti arrives for the inquest into the death of Sydney fraudster Melissa Caddick at Lidcombe Coroners Court in Sydney, Monday 12 September

Anthony Koletti arrives for the inquest into the death of Sydney fraudster Melissa Caddick at Lidcombe Coroners Court in Sydney, Monday 12 September

“I was like, she just went for a walk, which she does every day, no problem.”

The court heard that Caddick’s last verified sighting was by ASIC and Australian federal police officers at 6:30 p.m. on November 11, 2020, during their raid on her home in Dover Heights.

Authorities acted on the suspicion that she had executed a Ponzi scheme that embezzled $30 million from investors, including her friends and family.

Caddick’s son also said she saw her in the early hours of November 12.

“When I came back, I saw that her phone was still there, that was the first indication,” Koletti said in the police video.

“She’s not going anywhere without her phone. Then I checked the keys.’

Koletti does not say where he went in the video and does not answer a cop’s question when asked if she took her keys with her.

Instead, he keeps explaining how he sees things.

“She had to have her passport for the trial. That’s still there, everything. She has nothing,’ he said.

“I think she’s wearing black gym clothes and gray sneakers from memory.”

The disappearance of high-rolling conwoman Melissa Caddick after stealing $23.5 million to fund a glamorous lifestyle has become one of Australia's greatest unsolved mysteries

The disappearance of high-rolling conwoman Melissa Caddick after stealing $23.5 million to fund a glamorous lifestyle has become one of Australia's greatest unsolved mysteries

The disappearance of high-rolling conwoman Melissa Caddick after stealing $23.5 million to fund a glamorous lifestyle has become one of Australia’s greatest unsolved mysteries

Caddick, Anthony Koletti and her unnamed son in a holiday snap from a European ski trip

Caddick, Anthony Koletti and her unnamed son in a holiday snap from a European ski trip

Caddick, Anthony Koletti and her unnamed son in a holiday snap from a European ski trip

“What did she look like last night?” asks an officer.

“Look, she was fine. She was clearly shocked because we went through a huge ordeal. And she is not guilty and the AFP knows that.

“But because she’s done everything so right and narrow, she thinks she’s done something wrong, so I’m worried about her.”

Louise Coleman, a junior attorney who assisted the inquest, said Monday that three police officers who had taken Koletti’s missing person report were concerned about the bills he had provided.

Sergeant Trent Riley wrote in July 2021 that Mr Koletti had “told him several lies, (and) that his story had been changed several times,” the inquest heard.

The court also heard that the officers present found Mr. Koletti in a “composed, relaxed and apparently indifferent person…unlike any other person from whom I had previously received a missing persons report.”

The inquiry also heard an expert report examining the growth of barnacles on Ms. Caddick’s washed-up shoe concluded that it floated in the ocean for no more than a week and no less than two to three days.

Although Ms. Caddick is believed to be dead, a forensic pathologist was unable to determine whether her foot had been severed by blunt force, sharp force or decomposition before it washed ashore at Bournda Beach on the state’s southern coast.

But it is “very unlikely that Ms Caddick amputated her own foot,” with or without the help of a non-medically trained person, to fake her disappearance, Ms Coleman told deputy coroner Elizabeth Ryan.

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