Advertisement

How do you talk to your children about shooting at school?

Must Read

Jury to decide whether killing students was a hate crime

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. (AP) - Three friends were waiting around three on a Saturday at a bus stop on...

50 years ago SWAT invaded the Black Panthers. Since then it has focused on black communities

In the early morning hours of December 8, 1969, Bernard Arafat woke up with explosions that rocked the library...

Racing! Congratulations on Bob Baffert's five-win day

Hello my Name Is John Cherwa and welcome to our newsletter about horse racing, because we are pretty sure...

The Thursday shooting at Saugus High School in Santa Clarita touched intense, sinking fear with many teenagers seeking cover, barricaded class doors with tables and chairs, and hid in cupboards. Later, when they were reunited in a park, evacuated students and parents fell into each other's arms in long, tearful hugs.

"Fear made us feel like we were waiting in silence forever," said Andrei Mojica, 17, about his AP government class where students were preparing to use a fire extinguisher as a weapon if needed.

"How do we recover and step beyond this incident?" Asked Mojica.

While students deal with the aftermath of the Thursday shooting where two students were killed and three others were injured, parents and school staff can help them cope. Here are some tips from the National Assn. from school psychologists and other experts in the field of mental health:

1. Reassure the youth that they are safe now and confirm their feelings.

Adults must first take these important steps, experts say. Children who feel unsafe have difficulty concentrating or become anxious and anxious. Let children know that everything they feel is OK. Help them express those feelings.

2. Treat children according to their age.

Give young children only short, simple information. Limit the exposure of young children to television news, because violent images can cause secondary trauma and development-appropriate information can cause anxiety and confusion.

Read or view the news with teenagers and talk about it with them. This allows you to filter the information that they record. Answer specific questions with accurate information. Emphasize the role students can play in maintaining safe schools by following the school's safety guidelines, talking to administrators about personal safety issues and gaining access to support for emotional needs.

3. Healthy behavior model.

Children pick up everything their parents say and do, so stay calm when they talk to them or discuss a situation for them. Show how they can handle what they feel.

3. Have a plan.

Assess safety procedures at school and at home. Let children know who to call, where to meet and how to communicate in an emergency. This helps children to feel safe and to know that adults are in control.

4. Maintenance routines.

Sticking to normal routines can be reassuring and help children maintain a sense of normality. At the same time, do not encourage children to do their normal activities if they seem overwhelmed.

6. Pay attention to the emotional state of children and seek help if necessary.

Note changes in behavior, mood, appetite or sleep. For most children, these symptoms will disappear over time, but some may respond more violently and require help from a mental health professional.

Times staff writer Brittny Mejia contributed to this report.

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
FB.init({

appId : ‘119932621434123’,

xfbml : true,
version : ‘v2.9’
});
};

(function(d, s, id){
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)(0);
if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;}
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

Jury to decide whether killing students was a hate crime

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. (AP) - Three friends were waiting around three on a Saturday at a bus stop on...

50 years ago SWAT invaded the Black Panthers. Since then it has focused on black communities

In the early morning hours of December 8, 1969, Bernard Arafat woke up with explosions that rocked the library of the Black Panthers headquarters...

Racing! Congratulations on Bob Baffert's five-win day

Hello my Name Is John Cherwa and welcome to our newsletter about horse racing, because we are pretty sure who will win the 3-year...

Column: Trump receives little credit for foreign policy – for good reason

Last week's NATO summit in London should have been a nice little success story for President Trump. For once he went to an international...

Awarded by her bosses, the award-winning CBS TV reporter was fired. Then she went on

Investigative reporter Michele Gillen spent her career eradicating injustice. Gillen, one of the most recognizable TV personalities in South Florida, worked for two decades...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -