Business is booming.

How Australian money is set to change forever following the death of the Queen

How Australian money will change forever – with the $5 bill expected to feature King Charles and the monarch’s face on EVERY coin

  • Australian coins are updated with the portrait of King Charles
  • The Queen’s death affects the five, ten, 20 and 50 cents plus $1 and $2 coins
  • This is the biggest change in currencies since the debt in decimal currency in 1966
  • Her Majesty had also featured on the $5 bill since it replaced the paper in 1992
  • Australian coins change for the first time since Queen’s coronation in 1953
  • Full coverage: Click here to see all our coverage of the Queen’s death

<!–

<!–

<!–<!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

Australian coins and the $5 banknote will be updated with King Charles’s face after the Queen’s death at the age of 96.

The Royal Australian Mint in Canberra is planning simultaneous updates for all its coins for the first time since the introduction of decimal currency in February 1966.

The changes affect the five, ten, 20 and 50 cent coins, as well as the $1 and $2 coins, plus the $5 banknote produced by Securency, the polymer printing company of the Reserve Bank of Australia, in Melbourne.

Australian coins and the $5 banknote will be updated with King Charles after the Queen's death at age 96 (Pictured is a counterfeit version of the 20 cent coin)

Australian coins and the $5 banknote will be updated with King Charles after the Queen’s death at age 96 (Pictured is a counterfeit version of the 20 cent coin)

The changes will affect the five, ten, 20 and 50 cent coins, along with the $1 coins (shown) and $2, plus the $5 banknote produced by Securency, the polymer printing company of the Melbourne-based company Securency. Reserve Bank of Australia.

The changes will affect the five, ten, 20 and 50 cent coins, along with the $1 coins (shown) and $2, plus the $5 banknote produced by Securency, the polymer printing company of the Melbourne-based company Securency. Reserve Bank of Australia.

The changes will affect the five, ten, 20 and 50 cent coins, along with the $1 coins (shown) and $2, plus the $5 banknote produced by Securency, the polymer printing company of the Melbourne-based company Securency. Reserve Bank of Australia.

The late Queen Elizabeth had been on the old pennies after her coronation in June 1953.

The King Charles change, 73, marks the first change to Australian coinage since King George VI’s death in February 1952.

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992, and her portrait has graced the following banknotes ever since, with the most recent change in September 2016.

The Queen had been on the one and two cent coins from February 1966 until they were withdrawn from circulation in February 1992.

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992, and her portrait has graced the following banknotes since then, with the most recent change being in September 2016 (shown is a counterfeit $5 bill bearing King Charles)

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992, and her portrait has graced the following banknotes since then, with the most recent change being in September 2016 (shown is a counterfeit $5 bill bearing King Charles)

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992, and her portrait has graced the following banknotes since then, with the most recent change being in September 2016 (shown is a counterfeit $5 bill bearing King Charles)

The King Charles change is the first change to Australian coinage since King George VI's death in February 1952

The King Charles change is the first change to Australian coinage since King George VI's death in February 1952

The King Charles change is the first change to Australian coinage since King George VI’s death in February 1952

She has been on the $1 coin since it replaced a paper banknote in May 1984 and the $2 coin since it debuted in June 1988, also replacing a banknote.

Australia is one of 14 countries that had the Queen as head of state for seven decades, meaning currency designs will also be changed from New Zealand to Canada and Fiji.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Royal Australian Mint and the Reserve Bank of Australia.

The late husband of the Queen, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, opened the Royal Australian Mint in the Canberra suburb of Deakin in February 1965, a year before the decimal currency replaced the Australian pound.

The then Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies had wanted to call the new currency ‘royals’.

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992 and her portrait has graced the following banknotes ever since, with the most recent change being in September 2016

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992 and her portrait has graced the following banknotes ever since, with the most recent change being in September 2016

The Queen has been featured on the Australian $5 polymer banknote since the paper denomination was replaced in 1992 and her portrait has graced the following banknotes ever since, with the most recent change being in September 2016

.