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How a TEXT MESSAGE telling 27M Californians to lower energy consumption avoided rolling blackouts

How a TEXT MESSAGE that told 27 million Californians to cut energy use narrowly avoided a power outage as power grid collapsed under extreme heat wave: Tens of thousands of customers still lost power despite lower demand

  • A text alert sent to 27 million Californians narrowly helped the state avoid a power outage on Tuesday
  • The scorching heat wave led to a record demand of 52,061 megawatts
  • “Save energy now to protect public health and safety. Extreme heat strains the state’s energy grid,” the warning advised
  • Three-digit temps hammered the Golden State this week, with Central Valley and Sacramento

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As California’s electrical grid is hit by a relentless heatwave, it appears that a text message sent to 27 million residents has played a critical role in preventing progressive blackouts.

On Tuesday, power demand reached a record 52,061 megawatts amid the record-shattering heat wave, prompting grid operator California Independent System Operator (CAISO) to matter a level 3 power emergency alert, the highest, at 5:17 p.m. The agency made it clear that a power outage could occur.

At 5:45 p.m., the emergency services governor (Cal OES) issued a mobile phone alert — which went to approximately 27 million residents in 26 provinces — in English and Spanish That being said:

“Save energy now to protect public health and safety. Extreme heat strains the state’s energy grid. Power outages may occur unless you take action. Turn off or reduce non-essential power if health permits, now until 9 p.m..”

On Tuesday, energy demand hit a record 52,061 megawatts amid the record-shattering heat wave, prompting grid operator California Independent System Operator (CAISO) to issue a Level 3 energy emergency warning Above: People waiting their turn at a beach shower station of Santa Monica amid intense Southern California heatwave

On Tuesday, energy demand hit a record 52,061 megawatts amid the record-shattering heat wave, prompting grid operator California Independent System Operator (CAISO) to issue a Level 3 energy emergency warning Above: People waiting their turn at a beach shower station of Santa Monica amid intense Southern California heatwave

At 5:45 p.m., the Governor of the Emergency Services (Cal OES) issued a mobile phone alert in English and Spanish that read: 'Save energy now to protect public health and safety.  Extreme heat strains the state's energy grid.  Power outages may occur unless you take action.  Turn off or reduce non-essential power if health allows, now until 9 p.m.

At 5:45 p.m., the Governor of the Emergency Services (Cal OES) issued a mobile phone alert in English and Spanish that read: 'Save energy now to protect public health and safety.  Extreme heat strains the state's energy grid.  Power outages may occur unless you take action.  Turn off or reduce non-essential power if health allows, now until 9 p.m.

At 5:45 p.m., the Governor of the Emergency Services (Cal OES) issued a mobile phone alert in English and Spanish that read: ‘Save energy now to protect public health and safety. Extreme heat strains the state’s energy grid. Power outages may occur unless you take action. Turn off or reduce non-essential power if health allows, now until 9 p.m.

Officials say residents reduced their energy use within minutes of receiving the warning — as demand fell by about 1,200 megawatts between 5:50 AM and 5:55 AM.

About two hours later, CAISO declared that the severe level 3 energy emergency was over: “Consumer retention played a major role in protecting the reliability of the power grid. Thank you, California!’ the agency tweeted.

'As a result of this action [we] saw an immediate and significant drop in energy use, providing some relief to the state's electrical grid,

'As a result of this action [we] saw an immediate and significant drop in energy use, providing some relief to the state's electrical grid,

‘As a result of this action [we] saw an immediate and significant drop in energy use, providing some relief to the state’s electrical grid,” said Cal OES (led by Governor Gavin Newsom, above)

“As a result of this action, the California Independent System Operation (CaISO) saw an immediate and significant decrease in energy consumption, providing some relief to the state’s electrical grid,” Cal OES said in a statement. press release.

The state as a whole avoided rolling blackouts thanks to conservation efforts.

On Tuesday, however, tens of thousands of Northern Californians lost power.

The Golden State’s 39 million residents were scorched by triple-digit heat for days as temperatures in the state capital of Sacramento and parts of the Central Valley hit 114 degrees.

There were extreme heat warnings in most major cities.

Energy officials and utility companies had urged people to use less power from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. by keeping air conditioners at 78 degrees or higher and avoiding the use of large appliances such as ovens and dishwashers.

During the day, California’s power grid runs on a mix of mostly solar and natural gas, as well as some imports of power from other states. But solar energy begins to decline during the late afternoon and evening, which is the hottest time of the day in some parts of the state.

Meanwhile, some of the aging natural gas plants California relies on for backup power aren’t as reliable in hot weather.

Scientists say climate change has made the West warmer and drier over the past three decades and that the weather will continue to make more extremes and wildfires more frequent and destructive.

Officials say residents cut their energy use within minutes of receiving the warning (above) — as demand fell by about 1,200 megawatts between 5:50 AM and 5:55 AM

Officials say residents cut their energy use within minutes of receiving the warning (above) — as demand fell by about 1,200 megawatts between 5:50 AM and 5:55 AM

Officials say residents cut their energy use within minutes of receiving the warning (above) — as demand fell by about 1,200 megawatts between 5:50 AM and 5:55 AM

The Golden State's 39 million residents were scorched by triple-digit heat for days as temperatures in the state capital of Sacramento and parts of the Central Valley hit 114 degrees.  Above: People cool off in the ocean along Santa Monica Beach

The Golden State's 39 million residents were scorched by triple-digit heat for days as temperatures in the state capital of Sacramento and parts of the Central Valley hit 114 degrees.  Above: People cool off in the ocean along Santa Monica Beach

The Golden State’s 39 million residents were scorched by triple-digit heat for days as temperatures in the state capital of Sacramento and parts of the Central Valley hit 114 degrees. Above: People cool off in the ocean along Santa Monica Beach

Energy officials and utility companies had urged people to use less power from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. by keeping air conditioners at 78 degrees or higher and avoiding the use of large appliances such as ovens and dishwashers.  Above: People cool off in the river at Discovery Park during a heat wave in Sacramento, California

Energy officials and utility companies had urged people to use less power from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. by keeping air conditioners at 78 degrees or higher and avoiding the use of large appliances such as ovens and dishwashers.  Above: People cool off in the river at Discovery Park during a heat wave in Sacramento, California

Energy officials and utility companies had urged people to use less power from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. by keeping air conditioners at 78 degrees or higher and avoiding the use of large appliances such as ovens and dishwashers. Above: People cool off in the river at Discovery Park during a heat wave in Sacramento, California

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