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Greens leader Adam Bandt calls for Australia to become a republic hours after The Queen's death

Greens leader Adam Bandt calls for Australia to become a republic just five hours after the queen’s death was announced – saying the nation must ‘go forward’ and make a treaty with indigenous peoples

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Greens leader Adam Bandt has waited just five hours after the Queen’s death was announced to call on Australia to “go forward” and become a republic.

The staunch Republican, who refuses to hang the Australian flag with the Union Jack corner behind him during press conferences, posted a short tweet at 8.27 am.

‘Rest in peace Queen Elizabeth II. Our thoughts are with her family and everyone who loved her,” he began — his entire statement of condolence.

‘Now Australia has to move forward. We need a treaty with First Nations people, and we need to become a republic.”

Greens leader Adam Bandt has waited just five hours after Queen's death was announced to call on Australia to 'go forward' and become a republic

Greens leader Adam Bandt has waited just five hours after Queen’s death was announced to call on Australia to ‘go forward’ and become a republic

The Queen’s death was announced around 3:30 a.m. and Australian morning programs announced the news an hour later, followed by a statement from Prime Minister Anthony Albanese at 4:47 a.m.

Mr Bandt regularly calls for an Australian republic, because he believes that the country needs its own head of state and that the royal family is too closely linked to colonialism.

He used Harry and Meghan’s departure from the royal family to say if they could ‘sever ties with them’, ‘so could we’.

His deputy, Senator Mehreen Faruqi, said last year that Australia had to break away from the Queen because of the history of the British Empire.

The Queen's death was announced around 3:30 a.m. and Adam Bandt posted his tweet at 8:27 a.m

The Queen's death was announced around 3:30 a.m. and Adam Bandt posted his tweet at 8:27 a.m

The Queen’s death was announced around 3:30 a.m. and Adam Bandt posted his tweet at 8:27 a.m

“The royal family is in charge of an empire that has enslaved millions of black and brown people around the world. Their racism and colonialism continues,” she said.

‘If we are really interested in tackling racism in our country, we must cut ties with the royal family.’

Mr Bandt also supported controversial native Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe, who called the Queen a “colonizer” when she took her oath of office.

“I Sovereign, Lidia Thorpe, solemnly and sincerely swear that I will be and remain faithful to the colonizing Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II,” she said.

Senator Thorpe was reprimanded and, grinning, he eventually recited the oath correctly and was sworn into parliament.

“Senator Thorpe, Senator Thorpe, you are required to take the oath as shown on the card,” said Chamber Speaker Sue Lines.

Mr Bandt also supported controversial Native Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe who called the Queen a 'colonizer' when she took her oath of office

Mr Bandt also supported controversial Native Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe who called the Queen a 'colonizer' when she took her oath of office

Mr Bandt also supported controversial Native Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe who called the Queen a ‘colonizer’ when she took her oath of office

After reciting the pledge as required, Thorpe stated on Twitter, “Sovereignty was never relinquished.”

Mr. Albanian is also a Republican and appointed a minister for the republic to eventually break Australia with the monarchy – but not the Commonwealth.

The Australian Republican Movement reacted more cautiously to the Queen’s death, making only a veiled reference.

The Queen supported Australians’ right to become a fully independent nation in the 1999 Australian Republic referendum, saying she has “always made it clear that the future of the monarchy in Australia is a matter for the Australian Republic.” people and them alone to decide, by democratic and constitutional means,” it said.

In 1999, Australians narrowly voted against the removal of the Queen, amid an argument over whether her replacement would be chosen by MPs, not the public.

Polls show that most Australians are in favor of a republic, but there is little agreement on how a head of state should be elected.

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