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Fire breaks out at homeless encampment south of Los Angeles, causing major traffic jams

Firefighters fight a wildfire they say started in a Southern California homeless camp.

Footage of the fire showed large clouds of smoke along a busy highway in Los Angeles County Thursday night.

Though dramatic in appearance, the fire, which covered approximately four acres, posed no threat to any construction. However, it has closed Interstates 605 and 105, causing major traffic congestion.

The fire is coming as temperatures rise in LA, and some areas are predicted to hit triple-digit heat this weekend.

California is also at the height of its wildfire season, which meteorologists say has lengthened over the years due to dry conditions and above-normal temperatures due to climate change.

Firefighters fight wildfire they say started in Southern California homeless camp

Firefighters fight wildfire they say started in Southern California homeless camp

Firefighters believe Thursday’s inferno broke out around 6 p.m. local time in Norwalk along the San Gabriel River, where the two highways converge.

Initial reports say the fire started on the side of the highway at a possible homeless camp, county coordinators said. The Los Angeles Times.

At least six fire trucks responded to the blaze, which had grown to about four acres by 6:48 p.m. Firefighters were seen spraying water on the fire.

Firefighters faced ‘tough’ challenges as they tried to get some into the fire due to the roadside location, CBS Los Angeles reported. Officials were essentially limited to the water supply on the trucks.

The scene was still active at 8 p.m., but the fire continued, police said. The smoke from the smoke could be smelled as far as Fullerton, La Mirada, and Brea.

California Highway Patrol issued a warning at 8:11 a.m. to inform residents that several sections of the highway would be closed for at least two hours. It is not clear whether the roads have since reopened.

At least six fire trucks responded to the blaze, which had grown to about four acres by 6:48 p.m.  Crews were seen spraying water on the fire

At least six fire trucks responded to the blaze, which had grown to about four acres by 6:48 p.m.  Crews were seen spraying water on the fire

At least six fire trucks responded to the blaze, which had grown to about four acres by 6:48 p.m. Crews were seen spraying water on the fire

The scene was still active at 8 p.m., but the fire continued, police said.  The smoke from the smoke could be smelled as far as Fullerton, La Mirada, and Brea.  Officials close sections of I-105 and I-605.  off

The scene was still active at 8 p.m., but the fire continued, police said.  The smoke from the smoke could be smelled as far as Fullerton, La Mirada, and Brea.  Officials close sections of I-105 and I-605.  off

The scene was still active at 8 p.m., but the fire continued, police said. The smoke from the smoke could be smelled as far as Fullerton, La Mirada, and Brea. Officials close sections of I-105 and I-605. off

A driver in Norwalk, California photographed the burning bush ahead

A driver in Norwalk, California photographed the burning bush ahead

A driver in Norwalk, California photographed the burning bush ahead

Thursday’s fire comes as California continues to fight the 1,000-acre McKinney Fire, the deadliest and largest wildfire of the year in the state.

The fire broke out in Northern California’s Klamath National Forest on July 29, forcing thousands to evacuate.

More than 3,000 firefighters were deployed to the blaze, which was 80 percent under control as of Thursday.

The cause of the massive inferno is still under investigation, Cal Fire reported.

The McKinney Fire killed four people, injured seven and destroyed 185 residential and commercial buildings. Part of Highway 96 is still closed due to the fire.

The Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources also claimed the fire killed tens of thousands of fish along a 20-mile stretch of the Klamath River.

Officials say the fish died after the debris flow lowered oxygen levels in the river.

Thursday's fire comes as California continues to fight the 1,000-acre McKinney Fire, the deadliest and largest wildfire of the year in the state.  The McKinney Fire is pictured on July 31

Thursday's fire comes as California continues to fight the 1,000-acre McKinney Fire, the deadliest and largest wildfire of the year in the state.  The McKinney Fire is pictured on July 31

Thursday’s fire comes as California continues to fight the 1,000-acre McKinney Fire, the deadliest and largest wildfire of the year in the state. The McKinney Fire is pictured on July 31

The fire broke out in Northern California's Klamath National Forest on July 29, forcing thousands to evacuate.  As of Thursday, the McKinney Fire is 80 percent contained.  Damage from the fire is pictured on August 3

The fire broke out in Northern California's Klamath National Forest on July 29, forcing thousands to evacuate.  As of Thursday, the McKinney Fire is 80 percent contained.  Damage from the fire is pictured on August 3

The fire broke out in Northern California’s Klamath National Forest on July 29, forcing thousands to evacuate. As of Thursday, the McKinney Fire is 80 percent contained. Damage from the fire is pictured on August 3

Dead fish found on Aug. 6 on a 32-mile stretch of Northern California's Klamath River between Indian Creek and Seiad Creek.  Officials say the blazing McKinney Fire in the area killed tens of thousands of fish

Dead fish found on Aug. 6 on a 32-mile stretch of Northern California's Klamath River between Indian Creek and Seiad Creek.  Officials say the blazing McKinney Fire in the area killed tens of thousands of fish

Dead fish found on Aug. 6 on a 32-mile stretch of Northern California’s Klamath River between Indian Creek and Seiad Creek. Officials say the blazing McKinney Fire in the area killed tens of thousands of fish

California’s peak season runs from July to October, when the state experiences a drier climate.

The summer months have seen the highest number of fires, probably due to extreme heat, but officials say these fires generally result in less damage when looking at burned acres.

Cal Fire claims September and October are the most vulnerable months to wildfires in California, fueled by hot summers and little rainfall, resulting in dried vegetation. These types of infernos have proven to be the most destructive.

Meanwhile, temperatures are rising in LA County, which is not good for the area’s vegetation.

The National Weather Service, forecasting triple-digit temperatures this weekend, warned that valleys, mountains and deserts will bear the brunt of the extreme heat.

The McKinney Fire killed four people, injured seven and destroyed 185 residential and commercial buildings.  Fire damage is seen on August 4th

The McKinney Fire killed four people, injured seven and destroyed 185 residential and commercial buildings.  Fire damage is seen on August 4th

The McKinney Fire killed four people, injured seven and destroyed 185 residential and commercial buildings. Fire damage is seen on August 4th

California's peak season runs from July to October, when the state experiences a drier climate.  A firenado broke out in northwest Los Angeles on Wednesday.  It covered nearly 150 acres

California's peak season runs from July to October, when the state experiences a drier climate.  A firenado broke out in northwest Los Angeles on Wednesday.  It covered nearly 150 acres

California’s peak season runs from July to October, when the state experiences a drier climate. A firenado broke out in northwest Los Angeles on Wednesday. It covered nearly 150 acres

Drops of water were used to extinguish much of the firenado's flames, but footage showed a large amount of smoke pouring over the area.

Drops of water were used to extinguish much of the firenado's flames, but footage showed a large amount of smoke pouring over the area.

Drops of water were used to extinguish much of the firenado’s flames, but footage showed a large amount of smoke pouring over the area.

“The warmest temperatures will probably be over in the Antelope Valley,” meteorologist Roobie Munroe told the Time earlier this week. “Getting into the 103- to 105-degree range, which may be the peak of the heat.”

The forecast is typical for this time of year, and officials have yet to issue a warning of extreme heat.

Munroe noted that forecasters expected the area to see monsoon moisture soon, which could dampen the heat and reduce the threat of wildfires.

“Of course we need some rain,” he said. ‘If we talk about weeks after weeks with temperatures far above normal, this has major consequences for the drought. It’s going to be very important to see how we’re going to do next wet season.’

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