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Duchess of Cornwall looks stylish in a pink leopard print blouse

The Duchess of Cornwall undressed in style as she interviewed author Douglas Stuart about his ‘life-changing year’ after winning the Booker Prize with debut novel Shuggie Bain.

Camilla, 74, revealed her inner rock chick in a pink leopard print blouse and trouser suit, as she spoke to the Scottish author, who won the award in 2020 with Shuggie Bain, in an interview that aired during this year’s award ceremony. .

Based on Stuart’s own childhood, Shuggie Bain is set in 1980s Glasgow and tells the story of a boy growing up with a mother struggling with addiction.

The novel is dedicated to the Stuart’s mother, who died of an alcohol addiction when he was 16.

Speaking of his win, the 44-year-old author said: ‘It has totally changed my life, from winning the Booker to being here with yourself and being in the beautiful Clarence House. I couldn’t think of anything about it.’

The Duchess of Cornwall was stylishly dressed as she interviewed author Douglas Stuart about his 'life-changing year' after winning the Booker Prize with debut novel Shuggie Bain

The Duchess of Cornwall was stylishly dressed as she interviewed author Douglas Stuart about his ‘life-changing year’ after winning the Booker Prize with debut novel Shuggie Bain

Stuart said he didn’t tell anyone when he started writing Shuggie Bain.

“I tried to write it because I wanted it to be an incredibly personal project and I thought a lot about the Glasgow I grew up in and my own mother and my own family,” he said.

He added: “Often, mother stories and young gay men in very masculine places are often invisible and so Shuggie became a very personal document for me in that way, to say that we were always here, we are also in this landscape.”

During the interview, he also told Camilla that he “couldn’t even tell you how important the library was in my childhood.”

“It was just a very safe space,” he added. “It was a quiet space and it was a place where you could go and shut out the world a little bit.

“Libraries are crucial because children need an awful lot of peace in their environment to focus on a book, but also peace in themselves and libraries are one of the few places where they can have those moments of peace or just close the world.” out and enjoy a book.’

Based on Stuart's own childhood, Shuggie Bain is set in 1980s Glasgow and tells the story of a young boy growing up with a mother struggling with addiction.

Based on Stuart's own childhood, Shuggie Bain is set in 1980s Glasgow and tells the story of a young boy growing up with a mother struggling with addiction.

Based on Stuart’s own childhood, Shuggie Bain is set in 1980s Glasgow and tells the story of a young boy growing up with a mother struggling with addiction.

The writer is the second Scotsman ever to win the £50,000 prize after James Kelman took home the prize for How Late It Was, How Late in 1994.

Stuart was born and raised in Glasgow before moving to New York to pursue a career in fashion design at the age of 24, working for brands such as Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren and Gap.

He started writing in his spare time ten years ago and his short stories have since appeared in The New Yorker.

The author explores poverty, harsh parenting and alcoholism in his book

The author explores poverty, harsh parenting and alcoholism in his book

The author explores poverty, harsh parenting and alcoholism in his book

He was announced as the winner last year in a virtual ceremony with contributions from former US President Barack Obama and the Duchess of Cornwall.

The author said his Man Booker win meant he could give up his career in the fashion industry and devote himself to writing.

At the time, Margaret Busby, chairman of the jury who voted unanimously to celebrate Stuart’s book, described Shuggie Bain as “daring, terrifying and life-changing.”

She added: ‘The heartbreaking story tells of the unconditional love between Agnes Bain – whose life’s difficult circumstances push her on a descent into alcoholism – and her youngest son.

Shuggie struggles with responsibilities beyond his age to save his mother from himself, while simultaneously dealing with nascent feelings and questions about his own otherness.

Gracefully and powerfully written, this is a novel that makes an impact because of its many emotional registers and its compassionately realized characters.

This year's award went to Damon Galgut's novel The Promise (photo)

This year's award goes to Damon Galgut's novel The Promise (photo)

This year’s award goes to Damon Galgut’s novel The Promise (photo)

‘The poetry in Douglas Stuart’s descriptions and the precision of his observations are striking: nothing is wasted.’

The author explores poverty, harsh parenting and alcoholism in his book, which Busby says is “destined to become a classic.”

This year’s prize went to Damon Galgut’s novel The Promise.

Set in Pretoria, where the author grew up, The Promise is set against the backdrop of South Africa’s transition from apartheid.

The book tells the story of the declining Swart family, who are white farmers, through a series of four funerals.

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