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Dubonnet Sold Out In Stores As Fans Stock Up After It Received A Royal Warrant

Fans are rushing to get the aperitif loved by the royal family after it got their seal of approval last week.

Dubonnet, a French wine-based aperitif, has long been loved by the Queen herself and her mother the Queen Mother, who passed away in 2002. Last week it received a Royal Warrant.

The award will see ‘By Appointment to HM the Queen’ printed on bottles of Dubonnet from next year.

Waitrose has revealed that the drink, which costs £9.50, is sold out in stores and stocks are also limited on Amazon.

Waitrose has revealed no more bottles of Dubonnet have been sold after a Royl Warrant was awarded for the £9.50 drink last week.  The drink has long been loved by the Queen.  In the photo taking a sip of champagne during a visit to Slovenia in 2008

Waitrose has revealed no more bottles of Dubonnet have been sold after a Royl Warrant was awarded for the £9.50 drink last week. The drink has long been loved by the Queen. In the photo taking a sip of champagne during a visit to Slovenia in 2008

A Waitrose spokesperson has said they hope the £9.50 drink pictured will be back in stock by the end of the month

A Waitrose spokesperson has said they hope the £9.50 drink pictured will be back in stock by the end of the month

A Waitrose spokesperson has said they hope the £9.50 drink pictured will be back in stock by the end of the month

The supermarket chain revealed that Dubonnet’s sales jumped nearly 100 percent year-on-year last week.

A spokesperson for the store said they hoped to restock the stop before the end of the month.

Dubonnet was a popular aperitif in the 1960s and 1970s, when it sold 20 million bottles a year, but it fell out of favor in the 1980s.

Last year, however, the drink enjoyed a new lease of life, with annual sales rising from 350,000 to 500,000 between 2019 and 2020.

Pictured: The Queen Mother enjoying a glass of sherry in 1991. The royal, who died in 2002, had a taste for a glass of Dubonnet

Pictured: The Queen Mother enjoying a glass of sherry in 1991. The royal, who died in 2002, had a taste for a glass of Dubonnet

Pictured: The Queen Mother enjoying a glass of sherry in 1991. The royal, who died in 2002, had a taste for a glass of Dubonnet

Simon de Beauregard, owner Pernod Ricard, who produces the drink, said: ‘The growth is partly due to the lockdown, but we think it has more to do with consumers looking for a lower alcohol drink. It is fashionable among young people to use it in Negroni cocktails.’

The fortified wine, which contains herbs and spices, was made in France in the 1800s and has long been a favorite of royalty.

Last week, the Daily Mail reported that the Queen Mother asked her assistant to pack her two bottles of Dubonnet for her engagements.

She was reported to have once written a note on her Billy Tallon page that read, “I think I’ll bring 2 small bottles of Dubonnet and Gin this morning, just in case.”

The Queen has remained a fan of Dubonnet even after the drink fell out of favor with the public in the 1980s.  Pictured during a toast in Singapore in 1989

The Queen has remained a fan of Dubonnet even after the drink fell out of favor with the public in the 1980s.  Pictured during a toast in Singapore in 1989

The Queen has remained a fan of Dubonnet even after the drink fell out of favor with the public in the 1980s. Pictured during a toast in Singapore in 1989

The Queen herself enjoyed Dubonnet and gin before her recent alcohol break.

The drink was so loved by the royal that it was alleged that the Queen, her sister Princess Margaret and the Queen Mother drank almost a full bottle of gin and Dubonnet before a fateful dinner.

The Queen Mother had drunk so much that she reportedly missed her plate when she helped herself to dinner, before collapsing in a fit of giggles.

Dubonnet was first made in France as a tonic in the 1840s as a tonic to entice soldiers sent to North Africa to take their dose of quinine – the active ingredient in cinchona bark used to treat the disease. to prevent.

The soldiers hated the taste of quinine so much that they refused to take it, and the French government launched a call for a solution.

The Parisian chemist Joseph Dubonnet responded in 1846 with ‘quinquina Dubonnet’ – adding quinine, herbs and spices to fortified wine – this proved a success and the drink became popular when the soldiers returned from Africa.

After crossing the pond, Dubonnet became a hit and was soon embraced by the Queen Mother, who enjoyed it with gin.

It became a mid-range drink, before reaching its heyday in the 1970s after it was bought by Pernod Ricard, when American actress Pia Zadora became the brand’s model for a series of TV ads.

The drink’s popularity began to wane in the 1980s, but it has remained a favorite of the Crown.

The monarch’s allegiance to the drink was tested in 2009 when the Queen asked for a glass of Dubonnet at Lord’s Cricket Ground but was told none of the bars around the ground had stocked the drink, while the local liquor store scoffed at the fact that no one had asked for Dubonnet in 30 years.

A royal aide had to track down a bottle at a nearby supermarket and take it to the cricket ground to quench the royal’s thirst.

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