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Democrats build up abuse case against Trump next week

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House Democrats are going out next week with a case to accuse President Trump who is closely focused on his alleged abuse of power in relation to Ukraine, and – at least for the time being – putting aside other potential high crimes and crimes in the hope of making an argument as clear as possible.

The opening burst during the public hearings will be the argument that the Democrats find the most convincing: whether the President abused his power by requesting the Ukrainian government to investigate his political rivals while holding onto the country's approved aid to Congress.

The hearings will include three witnesses from the State Department who say they witnessed an attempt led by Trump's lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani, to influence US policy with the country.

The exclusion of other issues in next week's hearings – such as obstruction of justice or violations of the constitution's ban on the President making a profit from his office – is no sign that these issues may not be included in road articles , according to a senior democratic assistant.

In addition to an article about accusation about abuse of power, there is a division among Democrats about how wide the investigation into accusation should go. It is a division that is likely to peak when the House Judiciary Committee writes the articles of deposition, which may not happen until December. Several democrats say that articles have not been decided and that they will rely in part on evidence that comes out during public hearings.

"That will be a discussion," said Rep. Gerald E. Connolly (D-Va.), A member of the House Oversight Committee.

Cautious moderates want a scary issue about the president's phone conversation with the Ukrainian president, in which Trump asked for a & # 39; favor & # 39; from a political investigation into his rivals while maintaining support for the country.

"If you start to pile up with everything, you are just going to make it very messy, very cloudy for the public," said a moderate democratic legislator who granted anonymity to speak freely about internal deliberations.

Although both House Democrats supported a vote last week to determine the rules for the public phase of the investigation, several moderates are still skeptical about supporting accusation articles – and they will be watching closely to see what resonates with the public and their voters.

House speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) has insisted on the scary approach. Several other Democrats who speak on condition of anonymity say they expect this to be the strategy unless further evidence is unraveled.

"I trust Nancy's verdict," the moderate legislator said, citing how she kept Democrats from accusing rather than the findings in the Mueller report about Trump's alleged efforts to block the Special Counsel's investigation.

But progressives – many of whom supported accusations before hearing about Trump's actions with Ukraine – want the accusation articles to contain other allegations of misconduct, saying that it is their responsibility to pursue some violations and ignore others .

"Of course we don't want to stack every complaint we've ever had about the president in articles of deposition," said Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii). "On the other hand, this is a serious matter, and if we do not include clear violations of the constitution and obvious abuse of power, we will not come to the point."

There is some support for the drafting of an article about the president's violation of the prohibition of the constitution on the president who benefits from his office, known as the emoluments clause. House and Senate Democrats have filed a lawsuit against the issue but it could be detained for months in court. Democrats weigh up whether the evidence against the president on this issue is as ironic as they believe the argument is for abuse of power, according to a democratic legislator.

There is a growing consensus on obstruction of justice and obstruction of Congress, among other things. The House Intelligence Committee chairman, Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank), said that the White House's instruction that witnesses, such as former national security adviser John Bolton, do not testify, would serve as evidence of the obstruction of the President by Congress.

And some Democrats argue for obstruction to include evidence included by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III in his report.

“It would be foolish of us to ignore obstruction. Obstruction is a crime. It is documented in great detail in the Mueller report. He almost says it happened at least ten times, & Connolly said. "If we ignore obstruction, we tell future generations that it is off the table when a president commits, if you look at charges."

The precedent argument is likely to have a significant weight on experienced legislators who are the most invested in protecting the power of summons.

But given how little support there was for accusation about the Mueller report and how bad the report execution went for Democrats, some Democratic assistants think back to his name, suggesting reluctance to include Mueller-related charges in the articles.

The hearings will take place next week in the House Intelligence Committee, but five other committees are expected to send work related to the accusation investigation to this House Judiciary Committee as early as this month. It is that panel that will write articles and determine what the entire Parliament should vote on, possibly by the end of the year.

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