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Child safety experts urgently warn of ‘potentially deadly baby cinos’

Mother’s visit to cafe triggers warning of ‘potentially deadly baby cinos’ – and how to make sure the popular drink is safe for your child

  • Child safety experts have revealed marshmallows in baby cinos pose a danger
  • The sweet treat can get stuck in your child’s airways if not cut into pieces
  • This comes after an 18-month-old baby recently started ‘silently choking’ in a cafe


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Your child’s baby cino could be a death sentence, according to child safety experts, who warn that the marshmallow commonly served with the drink is a choking hazard.

The warning about the popular children’s treat was issued by: CPR Children following a harrowing story of a mother whose 18-month-old child nearly choked on a coffee date.

The woman said she was at the cafe with her baby and mother when he “quietly began to choke” after she quickly plucked the whole marshmallow from its cup and put it in his mouth when she wasn’t looking.

Your child's baby cino could be a death sentence, according to child safety experts who warn that the marshmallow typically served with the drink is a choking hazard

Your child’s baby cino could be a death sentence, according to child safety experts who warn that the marshmallow typically served with the drink is a choking hazard

In the past, Tiny Hearts Education, another child safety page on Facebook, shared a side-by-side comparison of an “unsafe” baby cino with a “big” marshmallow and a “safe” cup of “mini” marshmallows.

“I saw out of the corner of my eye that his face had turned red,” she said.

“I got up quickly and gave him a strong backstroke. The marshmallow came from his throat into his mouth and I was able to pull it out.’

The little boy was “upset for a minute or two” before asking for the marshmallow again.

But it took a little longer for his mother to recover.

“I was traumatized,” she said.

The facts about choking and what to do about it revealed

Choking is what happens when something gets stuck in a person’s throat or windpipe, partially or completely blocking airflow to their lungs.

In adults, choking usually occurs when a piece of food enters the trachea rather than the food pipe. Babies and young children can choke on anything smaller than a D battery.

Sometimes the trachea is only partially blocked. If the person can still breathe, he will probably be able to push the object out by coughing vigorously. Be careful not to do anything that pushes the blockage further into the trachea, such as banging on the person’s back while standing up.

If the object completely occludes the airway and the person is unable to breathe, it is now a medical emergency. The brain can only survive for a few minutes without oxygen.

Symptoms include throat tightness, difficulty breathing, and blue lips.

With children and adults over one year old and choking, you should try to keep the person calm. Ask them to cough to remove the object and if this doesn’t work, call triple zero (000). Bend the person forward and give him up to 5 sharp blows to the back between the shoulder blades with the heel of one hand. After each stroke, check that the blockage has been cleared.

If the blockage is still not cleared after 5 strokes, place one hand in the center of the person’s back for support. Place the heel of the other hand on the lower half of the sternum (in the central part of the chest). Press hard into the chest with a quick upward thrust, as if trying to lift the person. After each punch, check that the blockage has been released. If the block is not cleared after 5 punches, continue alternating 5 backstrokes with 5 chest punches until medical help arrives.

Source: Health directly

CPR Kids’ pediatric nurses added that the mother involved in the incident usually shreds large marshmallows for her baby.

But she hadn’t seen it coming next to the babycino when the waitress placed their order on the table.

The child safety experts said full-sized marshmallows pose a choking hazard for children under the age of five.

“Next time you order a babyccino, ask the cafe staff to omit the marshmallow, tear it into small pieces yourself, or pop it in your mouth before your little one notices,” they advised.

“There are many sources that talk about what age is too young to introduce foods like marshmallows, whole nuts and popcorn — many states under the age of five are not safe.” It also differs between individual children and when parents feel comfortable.’

The warning for the popular children's drink was issued by CPR Kids who received a harrowing story from a mother whose 18-month-old child nearly choked on a coffee date

The warning for the popular children's drink was issued by CPR Kids who received a harrowing story from a mother whose 18-month-old child nearly choked on a coffee date

The warning for the popular children’s drink was issued by CPR Kids who received a harrowing story from a mother whose 18-month-old child nearly choked on a coffee date

The message struck a chord with the CPR Kids community.

“I wish more people knew about this. I always feel very uncomfortable seeing toddlers with huge marshmallows. The coating on the marshmallow and the sticky consistency it forms in the mouth also make it harder to loosen if it gets stuck in the airways,” said one mother.

Others said cafes should be “proactive” and include only mini marshmallows or cut off the babycino altogether.

“A lot of cafe people and even friends sometimes don’t think and give children things that are not really for little ones,” said one woman.

The Basic Child Safety Checklist

BEDROOM

1. All window treatments must be wireless or have cord clamps installed so that they are out of the reach of children

2. Move cribs, beds, chairs and other furniture away from windows

3. Install window protection in all rooms on the second floor

LIVING ROOM

4. Mount furniture and TVs to the walls

5. Cover all outlets, even those you think are out of reach

6. Install safety gates at the top and bottom of all stairs

KITCHEN/BATHROOM

7. Add security locks to all drawers and doors

8. Put cleaning supplies, medicines and other toxic items in a locked cupboard that is out of reach

9. Use stove knob protectors to make sure they are temporarily unusable

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