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CERN is considering 'idling' the Large Hadron Collider in response to Europe's energy crisis

The energy crisis in Europe is being felt by everyone – including the scientists working deep underground in Switzerland at the Large Hadron Collider.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research, better known as CERN, is even considering taking its particle accelerators offline.

This is due to the high energy demand of the accelerators and the organization’s desire to keep the electricity grid in the region stable.

However, the scientists don’t want to shut down the Large Hadron Collider completely, so they plan to put it in “idle” mode temporarily.

“It is a voluntary action,” CERN energy president Serge Claudet told the Wall Street Journalwho first reported the action.

“You don’t want to break your toy.”

CERN operates the Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator (pictured), famous for its 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson

CERN operates the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator (pictured), famous for its 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson

At peak times, CERN uses nearly 200 megawatts of power - a third as much energy as the city of Geneva - making it one of France's largest energy consumers

At peak times, CERN uses nearly 200 megawatts of power - a third as much energy as the city of Geneva - making it one of France's largest energy consumers

At peak times, CERN uses nearly 200 megawatts of power – a third as much energy as the city of Geneva – making it one of France’s largest energy consumers

WHAT ARE THE PLANS TO REDUCE CERN’S ENERGY CONSUMPTION?

At peak times, CERN uses nearly 200 megawatts of power — a third as much energy as the city of Geneva — making it one of France’s largest energy consumers.

The proposal is to shut down most of CERN’s eight particle accelerators during peak times to reduce energy consumption by 25 percent.

This will be presented at the end of the month to government representatives from France and Switzerland, who are funding the operation.

However, it only wants to shut down the €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) Large Hadron Collider, as a shutdown would delay experiments by weeks.

This is due to the amount of time and energy required to cool the superconducting magnets needed to bend the particle beam around the tunnel.

The news came after Gazprom, Russia’s state energy agency, announced last Friday that it would shut down natural gas supplies to Germany through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline indefinitely.

This is the main route Russia uses to export gas to Europe and was shut down for three days before the ‘maintenance’ announcement.

Moscow blamed ‘oil leaks’ in a turbine for the delay in reopening the pipeline, but claimed it was due to equipment failures at Siemens, its German partner.

Gazprom warned that a lack of spare parts threatened the Portovaya compressor station near St. Petersburg.

It quoted Siemens as saying the necessary repairs could only be carried out in “the conditions of a specialist workshop.”

However, Alexei Miller, the director of Gazprom, has claimed that engineers will not be able to make the repairs, until sanctions against his company – a claim German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has since disputed.

“It is clear that nothing, absolutely nothing, stands in the way of the further transport of this turbine and its installation in Russia. It can be transported and used at any time,” says Scholz The New York Times.

The energy giant already cut flows through Nord Stream by 40 percent in June, accelerating wholesale gas prices.

Russia has been accused of arming gas supplies in retaliation against the European Union for supporting Ukraine in repelling the Russian invasion.

This news came after Gazprom, Russia's state energy agency, announced last Friday that it would indefinitely shut down natural gas supplies through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to Germany.

This news came after Gazprom, Russia's state energy agency, announced last Friday that it would indefinitely shut down natural gas supplies through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to Germany.

This news came after Gazprom, Russia’s state energy agency, announced last Friday that it would indefinitely shut down natural gas supplies through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to Germany.

Alexei Miller, the CEO of Gazprom, has claimed that engineers would not be able to make necessary repairs to the turbines due to sanctions against his company, which German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has disputed.  He posted a photo of himself next to the fixed turbine and accused Moscow of blocking the return of the critical device

Alexei Miller, the CEO of Gazprom, has claimed that engineers would not be able to make necessary repairs to the turbines due to sanctions against his company, which German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has disputed.  He posted a photo of himself next to the fixed turbine and accused Moscow of blocking the return of the critical device

Alexei Miller, the CEO of Gazprom, has claimed that engineers would not be able to make necessary repairs to the turbines due to sanctions against his company, which German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has disputed. He posted a photo of himself next to the fixed turbine and accused Moscow of blocking the return of the critical device

At peak times, CERN uses nearly 200 megawatts of power — a third as much energy as the city of Geneva — making it one of France’s largest energy consumers.

Mr Claudet told the Wall Street Journal, “Our concern is really grid stability as we are doing everything we can to avoid a power outage in our region.”

“If we get a budget to do science and we stop science voluntarily to save energy, then we have to make sure we get the support of the respective countries.”

The proposal is for CERN to shut down most of the eight particle accelerators during peak demand periods to reduce energy consumption by 25 percent.

This will be presented at the end of the month to government representatives from France and Switzerland, who are funding the operation.

However, it only wants to shut down the €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) Large Hadron Collider, as a shutdown would delay experiments by weeks.

This is due to the amount of time and energy required to cool the superconducting magnets needed to bend the particle beam around the tunnel.

Mr Claudet said the Swiss science facility is in talks with its French energy supplier, EDF SA, to get a 24-hour warning if it needs to cut its energy consumption.

CERN only wants to shut down the €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) Large Hadron Collider, because a shutdown would delay experiments by weeks.  Pictured: A General View of the Large Hadron Collider

CERN only wants to shut down the €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) Large Hadron Collider, because a shutdown would delay experiments by weeks.  Pictured: A General View of the Large Hadron Collider

CERN only wants to shut down the €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) Large Hadron Collider, because a shutdown would delay experiments by weeks. Pictured: A General View of the Large Hadron Collider

In April, the Large Hadron Collider was restarted after a three-year hiatus for maintenance and to make the instruments more sensitive.

The LHC works by breaking atoms together to break them apart and discover the subatomic particles that exist within them, and how they interact.

The upgrades have given researchers a higher-resolution image in atoms — data captured 30 million times per second — and allowed for more runs.

Since then, scientists have announced the discovery of three new “exotic particles” that could help explain how our universe came to be.

The new structures are only a hundred-thousandth of a billionth of a billionth of a second and are made up of quarks, the smallest particles ever discovered.

Atoms contain smaller particles called neutrons and protons, each made up of three quarks, while this “exotic” matter is made up of four and five quarks – known as tetraquarks and pentaquarks.

The discovered particles are one new pentaquark and two tetraquarks, taking total number found at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland to 21.

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider announced in July the discovery of three new 'exotic particles' that could help explain how our universe formed

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider announced in July the discovery of three new 'exotic particles' that could help explain how our universe formed

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider announced in July the discovery of three new ‘exotic particles’ that could help explain how our universe formed

WHAT IS THE LARGE HADRON NECKLACE?

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator.

It is located in a 27 kilometer tunnel under the Swiss-French border.

The LHC started colliding with particles in 2010. Within the 27 km long LHC ring, clusters of protons travel at nearly the speed of light and collide at four points of interaction.

Inside the accelerator, two high-energy particle beams travel at nearly the speed of light before colliding. The beams run in opposite directions in separate beam tubes.

They are guided around the accelerator ring by a strong magnetic field maintained by superconducting electromagnets.

The LHC (pictured) was restarted on April 5 this year, after being shut down for two years during a major £100m refurbishment project

The LHC (pictured) was restarted on April 5 this year, after being shut down for two years during a major £100m refurbishment project

The LHC (pictured) was restarted on 5 April 2015, after being shut down for two years during a major £100m refurbishment project

The electromagnets are made up of coils of a special electrical cable that works in a superconducting state and conducts electricity efficiently without resistance or energy loss.

These collisions generate new particles, which are measured by detectors surrounding the interaction points.

A rendering of the LHC's Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is shown

A rendering of the LHC's Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is shown

A rendering of the LHC’s Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is shown

By analyzing these collisions, physicists from around the world deepen our understanding of the laws of nature.

While the LHC can produce up to 1 billion proton-proton collisions per second, the HL-LHC will increase this number, called “brightness” by physicists, by a factor of between five and seven, yielding about 10 times more data between 2026 and 2036. must be collected.

This means that physicists can investigate rare phenomena and measure them more accurately.

For example, the LHC enabled physicists to excavate the Higgs boson in 2012, making great strides in understanding how particles obtain their mass. The subatomic particle had been theorized for a long time, but was not confirmed until 2013.

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