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Benchmarks of the future Intel i9-12900K are filtered in which it surpasses the AMD Ryzen 9 5950X and the Apple M1 in single and multi core

A few days ago we learned from Intel many of the details of Alder Lake, the hybrid architecture that will bring us the twelfth generation processors. We have not yet been able to test how well the high-performance and high-efficiency cores that will be released from the end of the year perform, when they are scheduled to be commercialized, but the first benchmarks of a processor of the family have appeared, the Intel Core i9-12900K, and they are very promising.

According to several tests with Geekbench 5 that have been leaked, the i9 Alder Lake outperforms both the Ryzen 5000 and the Apple silicon M1 chip in single core, that is, when a single core is being used for the test, a variable that follows being very important in certain uses.

Here’s what Geekbench 5 tells us about the i9-12900K

Alder Lake

As in all filtered benchmarks, everything that Geekbench 5 shows about the i9-12900K has to be taken with a grain of salt for the moment. As of today it shows that it has been run on the Intel test platform, and that it has 16 cores (8 + 8) and 24 threads of execution. This is an increase from the 8 cores of the i9-11900K, which had 8 cores and 16 threads. The number has grown considerably due to the inclusion of high-performance cores.

The base frequency shown by Geekbench 5 for this processor is 3.20 GHz. In maximum frequency it indicates 3 MHz, which is obviously an error, since it is expected to reach 5.3 GHz. Although there are many benchmarks made in different conditions, comparing with one of its competitors, the Ryzen 9 5950X, we get that Intel returns to the top of the podium with a single core score of 1834, more than 6.5% more than what AMD achieved in our tests and 5% more than what a MacBook Pro with M1 achieved.

The fact that Intel so easily outperforms AMD in multi-core is due to taking advantage of the new high-efficiency cores

In multi-core, the fact of having added high-efficiency cores is worth it to go from about 11,000 points to 17,370, which also helps it outperform the Ryzen 9 5950X in this test by 25%. Here, of course, the M1 is out of the game with only 4 high-performance and 4 high-efficiency cores.

We will have to wait until we can test the Alder Lake family to draw conclusions, since these figures have not taken into account values ​​as important as the TDP or the IPC, where AMD and Apple have clearly won so far with their latest available architecture.