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Anti-monarchy protesters in Melbourne smear fake blood on the Portuguese coat of arms, not British

Fired-up Indigenous protesters smeared the wrong royal crest with fake blood during anti-monarchy protests in Melbourne led by Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe.

Thousands of protesters rallied against British colonisation in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Canberra during Thursday’s national day of mourning for Queen Elizabeth II.

The most dramatic scenes were in Melbourne – where demonstrators set fire to the Australian flag and smeared a royal emblem with red dye in a bid to bring attention to how Aboriginal people have suffered from British colonisation.

However, protesters demonstrating outside the building that houses the British consulate on Melbourne’s Collins St unknowingly smeared the wrong royal emblem with fake blood – vandalising the coat of arms for the Portuguese monarchy.

Anti-monarchy protesters in Melbourne covered the Portuguese coat of arms in fake blood, not the British coat of arms (pictured, the Portuguese coat of arms covered in blood)

Anti-monarchy protesters in Melbourne covered the Portuguese coat of arms in fake blood, not the British coat of arms (pictured, the Portuguese coat of arms covered in blood)

Protesters covered the Portuguese coat of arms (above) in fake blood during an anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne

Protesters covered the Portuguese coat of arms (above) in fake blood during an anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne

Protesters covered the Portuguese coat of arms (above) in fake blood during an anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne

It is understood protesters believed they were covering the British coat of arms in fake blood but actually vandalised the Portuguese coat of arms (pictured, protesters covering the Portuguese coat of arms in red dye)

It is understood protesters believed they were covering the British coat of arms in fake blood but actually vandalised the Portuguese coat of arms (pictured, protesters covering the Portuguese coat of arms in red dye)

It is understood protesters believed they were covering the British coat of arms in fake blood but actually vandalised the Portuguese coat of arms (pictured, protesters covering the Portuguese coat of arms in red dye)

The Portuguese monarchy which was disbanded in 1910 in favour of a republic. 

Representatives for the building’s managers were able to explain the presence of the coat of arms out the front. 

Avowed monarchist and Victorian Liberal MP Tim Smith tweeted: ‘I hate to break it to the protesters … but 90 Collins St is not owned by the Commonwealth & the protesters bizarrely smeared fake blood on the royal arms of the now defunct monarchy of Portugal.’

Senator Thorpe was a leading voice in the protest, addressing the crowd with hands dripping with fake blood. 

‘The Crown has blood on their hands. Our people are still dying in this country every single day,’ Ms Thorpe said.

‘The Crown’s boot is on our neck and we’re sick of it.’

Federal Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe was a leading voice in the Melbourne protest and gave a speech before the Portuguese coat of arms was vandalised

Federal Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe was a leading voice in the Melbourne protest and gave a speech before the Portuguese coat of arms was vandalised

Federal Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe was a leading voice in the Melbourne protest and gave a speech before the Portuguese coat of arms was vandalised

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne (above) to bring attention to how Indigenous people have suffered from colonisation, for which they see the royal family as a figurehead

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne (above) to bring attention to how Indigenous people have suffered from colonisation, for which they see the royal family as a figurehead

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne (above) to bring attention to how Indigenous people have suffered from colonisation, for which they see the royal family as a figurehead

Demonstrators in Brisbane set fire to the Australian flag (above) as part of anti-monarchy protests

Demonstrators in Brisbane set fire to the Australian flag (above) as part of anti-monarchy protests

Demonstrators in Brisbane set fire to the Australian flag (above) as part of anti-monarchy protests

Hundreds of protesters also gathered in Brisbane’s CBD after marching from the Queen Victoria Statue.

One speaker at the protest said: ‘Our message to England and the Monarchy is to f**king burn.’

‘We don’t need the numbers, we just need the passion,’ another protester said. 

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe appeared dripping with fake blood at the anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne on Thursday

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe appeared dripping with fake blood at the anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne on Thursday

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe appeared dripping with fake blood at the anti-monarchy protest in Melbourne on Thursday

Protest signs called for reforms including the introduction of an Indigenous treaty, Australia to become a republic and for justice in response to reports of First Nations deaths in custody (pictured, a protester carrying the Aboriginal flag in Melbourne)

Protest signs called for reforms including the introduction of an Indigenous treaty, Australia to become a republic and for justice in response to reports of First Nations deaths in custody (pictured, a protester carrying the Aboriginal flag in Melbourne)

Protest signs called for reforms including the introduction of an Indigenous treaty, Australia to become a republic and for justice in response to reports of First Nations deaths in custody (pictured, a protester carrying the Aboriginal flag in Melbourne)

A banner at the protest read ‘No Kings, No Cops, No Capitalists’, carried by the economic-reformist group the Socialist Alternative.

Other protesters at the rally wore shirts calling for Australia Day to be abolished.

Demonstrators in Sydney gathered in front of the city’s Town Hall and used speakers to address crowds from the building’s sandstone steps.

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne on Thursday (above) to protest the monarchy on Australia's national day of mourning for Queen Elizabeth II

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne on Thursday (above) to protest the monarchy on Australia's national day of mourning for Queen Elizabeth II

Demonstrators gathered in Melbourne on Thursday (above) to protest the monarchy on Australia’s national day of mourning for Queen Elizabeth II

Activist groups Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance (WAR) and Fighting In Solidarity Towards Treaties helped organised the nation-wide protests following the Queen’s death.

‘This is a stance against the continued crimes committed against marginalised First Nations, black, brown and Asian communities. We do not support benefactors or Stolenwealth (sic) and demand justice, truth and accountability for all. Justice for all,’ WAR wrote on Facebook.

‘This is a demonstration against racist colonial imperialism.’

Signs and banners at the protests called for reforms including the introduction of an Indigenous treaty, Australia to become a republic and for justice in response to reports of First Nations deaths in custody.