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Albany WA: Killer kangaroo kept paramedics from saving alpaca breeder Peter Eades

The inside story of how killer kangaroo cruelly mauled his owner and then BLOCKED ambos to save his life – as it’s revealed a rancher raised it from a joey… only to betray him

  • Alpaca breeder Peter Eades, 77, died when his pet kangaroo fatally attacked him
  • Paramedics at the scene were unable to reach his body because of the kangaroo
  • Police had to shoot an animal but Mr Eades could not be rescued and died on the spot
  • Mr. Eades had dug his own grave in the animal cemetery he had built for his alpacas

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A deadly kangaroo devastated its owner, then guarded the dying man’s body to prevent paramedics from trying to rescue him.

Alpaca breeder Peter Eades, 77, was killed when his pet suddenly turned on him on Sunday, unleashing a violent attack that fatally wounded the elderly man.

Paramedics called Mr Eades’ rural home near Redmond, in southern Western Australia, and were unable to reach him due to the aggressive kangaroo.

The kangaroo had to be shot dead by police – and Mr Eades died tragically from his injuries on the spot.

It is considered the first fatal roo attack in Australia since 1936.

Alpaca breeder Peter Eades, 77, was killed when his pet suddenly turned on him, unleashing a violent attack in which the elderly man was fatally injured

Alpaca breeder Peter Eades, 77, was killed when his pet suddenly turned on him, unleashing a violent attack in which the elderly man was fatally injured

“The kangaroo posed an ongoing threat to emergency services and officers present had to kill the kangaroo with a firearm,” a spokesman said.

Emergency services have not yet released details about Mr Eades’ injuries.

Mr. Eades was a noted animal lover who refused to sell his alpacas for meat and often rescued the animals from owners who could no longer handle them.

Locals revealed that the grandfather hand-reared his kangaroo from a joey after adopting him three years ago.

The devoted animal lover had already dug his own grave in a homemade cemetery so that he could be buried with his precious pets.

Mr. Eades revealed five years ago that he had created the burial ground on his land for all of his beloved alpacas when they died.

Each was commemorated with a headstone or cross with their name, and he even dug a spot for himself next to his favorite alpaca, Claudia.

Paramedics called to the rural home near Redmond in southern Western Australia were unable to reach the elderly man due to the aggressive kangaroo (stock image pictured)

Paramedics called to the rural home near Redmond in southern Western Australia were unable to reach the elderly man due to the aggressive kangaroo (stock image pictured)

Paramedics called to the rural home near Redmond in southern Western Australia were unable to reach the elderly man due to the aggressive kangaroo (stock image pictured)

The devoted animal lover had already dug his own grave in a homemade cemetery so he could be buried with his precious pets

The devoted animal lover had already dug his own grave in a homemade cemetery so he could be buried with his precious pets

The devoted animal lover had already dug his own grave in a homemade cemetery so he could be buried with his precious pets

He started his Agonis Alpaca stud farm in 1997, 25 northwest of Albany, with a herd of 60, each named individually.

He retired in recent years, but had kept the alpacas as precious pets.

About 20 of the animals were buried in his paddock cemetery, including his favorite Claudia who died 20 years ago, breaking Mr. Eades’ heart.

“She was the most beautiful animal, extremely affectionate,” he told the ABC in 2017. “She would sit next to me, put her head on my lap and go to sleep.

“I laid the tombstones in their memory. People are buried, many dog ​​owners bury their animals and have small decals on them.

“I dug my grave here too.”

He added: “My feeling for alpacas is such that I started doing it and I just keep doing it. I’m a little different.

“I love my animals very much.”

WHY ATTACK KANGAROOS?

Kangaroos are usually docile creatures and interactions with humans are rare.

They can be unpredictable when they feel that they are being threatened, or that their territory is being invaded – either by a human or another animal.

Fewer than five people a year seek treatment for kangaroo attacks in NSW.

The most common reasons for a kangaroo to attack a human are:

  • They see the person as a threat or a sparring opponent. They will often try to protect their group or offspring.
  • The kangaroo has lost its instinctive fear of humans – usually due to humans feeding or handling it from a young age.
  • The kangaroo is in unfamiliar territory or has recently moved from habitat. Natural disasters such as drought and fires can force a kangaroo out of its home and closer to roads and trails to seek food and water, posing a threat.

When a kangaroo attacks a person, it will generally do so in the same way as fighting another kangaroo, using its paws to push or “grab” the opponent to the ground.

How to avoid threatening a kangaroo:

• Do not walk directly in the direction of the kangaroo.

• Do not stand up, stare or stretch your arms at a kangaroo.

• Do not go near male kangaroos sparring, fighting or showing off their size and strength to each other.

• Do not move between a female and her joey.

• Do not allow your dog to approach a kangaroo. Kangaroos will defend themselves vigorously against dogs, and this can put you in a dangerous situation.