Advertisement

Advice: there is no profile of a mass shooting game. Our data shows that there are five types

Must Read

LeBron James and Anthony Davis combine for 70 in Lakers & # 39; newest road route in Portland

For some teams, NBA road trips can create debilitating, hostile situations.For these Lakers they are usually fun and games.On...

Chayden Peery is about to take Sierra Sierra to the final

Before Sierra Canyon headed south to face La Mesa Helix in the Division 1-AA Southern California Regional playoff game,...

South Torrance rolls past Canoga Park for a state-scale bid

South Torrance's Kade Jones, a 5-foot-10 junior defensive back, continues to dare quarterbacks to throw football in his direction....

On Thursday morning in Santa Clarita, the details of the last massive shooting in America came forward quickly: two victims, a teenage girl and a boy, were dead; three others were injured; and a 16-year-old male suspect, a student at the Saugus High School, was in custody with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Andrei Mojica, who was in his AP government class when the shooting started, described a now familiar exercise – building a barricade with desks and chairs against the classroom door, grabbing a fire extinguisher for protection and sinking, trying to hear what was up to the hand.

"The fear made it seem like we were waiting in silence forever," Andrei Mojica told The Times.

After every massive shooting, myths compete with facts while researchers do their meticulous work. We will have to wait until the full story appears, but so far the Santa Clarita shooter fits with remarkable fidelity in the profile we have found, defining K-12 rifle violent offenders, one of the five such massive shooter profiles in general.

As part of a project funded by the US Department of Justice, we have studied all 171 mass shootings in public spaces killed four or more people between 1966 and 2019. Apart from that, we also watched episodes in which active shooters killed one or more people and nearly killed more.

Who does such a thing? This is what we have learned.

The vast majority (98%) of mass shooters are men. Fifty-two percent are white and 70% of them know at least some of their victims. In most cases they do not use assault weapons (only 25%), although that figure is rising (to 39% in the last 10 years). Guns remain the favorite weapon of mass shooters, as is true of American murders in general and as was the case in Santa Clarita.

And even those facts do not give a complete picture. In our database we have coded each of the mass shooters, taking into account more than 100 variables related to their life history and crimes. The results, which we will publish on Tuesday, make it clear that to really understand the profiles of such killers, you have to look at where the crime took place. Attacks in churches are committed by a different type of person than attacks in shopping centers and restaurants. And attacks on schools are carried out by very different types, depending on whether they are in colleges or high schools.

The variables of the Santa Clarita shooter are added to the first category.

  • The K-12 school shooting game (based on our analysis of 13 mass shooters and 54 attempted mass shooters) is usually a white (85%) male (100%) student or former student of the school (91%) with a history of trauma (70%) ). About 92% of the K12 shooters are suicidal. The affected schools are usually suburbs or national (92%) public (98%) secondary schools (93%), and the shootings usually take place at the beginning or end of the school year, in September or May. About 87% of the K-12 shooters leak their plans in advance, and 85% show a high degree of planning. The majority of shooters are more interested in weapons and use multiple weapons from family members 80% of the time.
  • The college and university shooter (nine mass shooters) is usually a non-white person (11% black, 45% Asian, 33% white), male (100%), current university student (78%) with a history of violence (89%) and childhood trauma (67%) that is suicidal (100%). About 89% of college shooters use legally acquired guns and 78% leave messages about their crimes, such as videos or manifestos. These recordings usually take place at large, urban, public universities.
  • The workplace shooter (48 mass shooters) is usually a man (96%) in his forties who is an employee of the shooting location (78%) and has problems working. Workshop shooters have no racial profile (40% white, 30% black, 10% latino). They usually use pistols (85%) that they legally own (71%). About 90% of these shootings take place at "work sites" and 83% of the perpetrators have recently been fired or suspended. About 78% of the shooters in the workplace are suicidal and 31% have a military background. The communities where shootings take place in the workplace are mostly predominantly white with low percentages of university education and high unemployment rates, usually in the south or west.
  • The house of worship shooter (11 mass shooters) is usually a white (73%) man (100%) in his forties who is suicidal (73%). About 78% of such shootings concern Christian churches, followed by 16% in synagogues or other Jewish meeting places, and nearly 50% of the perpetrators know their victims. All the perpetrators used a gun and 36% also used an assault rifle. These shootings show a low degree of planning and are more focused, often motivated by family problems (30%) or racial or ethnic hatred (40%). About 73% of the archers have previous criminal records and violent history.
  • The shop / restaurant shooter (46 mass shooters) is usually a white (57% white, 17% black) man (100%) of about 30, without connection to the location. About 65% use one gun, usually a gun (67%). A third shows evidence of a thought disorder, 67% of the perpetrators have a violent history, 71% have a criminal record and 22% have a military background. Only 9% of these attacks show a high level of planning. We have seen the largest increase in this category in recent years.

Understanding what kind of person commits these crimes in each of the different institutions is just a first step. We also need to use the profiles to better prevent and respond to mass shootings. For example because school shooters are almost always students of the school – changes in the design of buildings and performing active shooting exercises are probably not effective, because the shooter is an insider, well rehearsed in the security procedures. The same applies to workplace shooters, who are usually employees or former employees.

In each category, more than 80% of the perpetrators are prior to the shooting. Investment in school and employment – based mental health and training in crisis intervention and complaint limitation can help prevent attacks.

Age restrictions, "Red flag" laws, waiting times and background checks for all firearm sales can help prevent shootings at universities where a large majority of perpetrators are in a known crisis and legally purchase weapons, despite history of psychiatric hospitalization (44%) or criminal record (67%) .

Investments in & # 39; s programs for domestic violence and aggressive monitoring of the internet to deploy compensatory message traffic and disrupt online hate groups can help to prevent shootings in the church. Target hardening and others situational crime prevention measures may be most important for shops, bars and restaurants, where the offender is usually not connected to the site.

Once we understand massive violence, we can think of interventions that will reduce this. But for that you need to go beyond party lines above gun control to plan and implement data-driven, evidence-based solutions.

Jillian Peterson is a psychologist and professor of criminology and criminal law at Hamline University. James Densley is a sociologist and professor of criminal law at Metropolitan State University. They lead the Violence Project.

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
FB.init({

appId : ‘119932621434123’,

xfbml : true,
version : ‘v2.9’
});
};

(function(d, s, id){
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)(0);
if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;}
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

LeBron James and Anthony Davis combine for 70 in Lakers & # 39; newest road route in Portland

For some teams, NBA road trips can create debilitating, hostile situations.For these Lakers they are usually fun and games.On...

Chayden Peery is about to take Sierra Sierra to the final

Before Sierra Canyon headed south to face La Mesa Helix in the Division 1-AA Southern California Regional playoff game, Trailblazers coach Jon Ellinghouse shared...

South Torrance rolls past Canoga Park for a state-scale bid

South Torrance's Kade Jones, a 5-foot-10 junior defensive back, continues to dare quarterbacks to throw football in his direction. It is really a fool.He...

Football: Southern California regional and Northern California regional results

PLAY CIF STATE FOOTBALLSECTION 1-AASouth: Sierra Canyon 38, La Mesa Helix 20North: Fresno Central 38, El Dorado Hills Oak Ridge 32 National Championship Bowl: Sierra...

Clippers are claimed in loss against Bucks and Giannis Antetokounmpo

Giannis Antetokounmpo had 27 points and 11 rebounds to lead the Milwaukee Bucks to their 14th consecutive victory, a route of 119-91 from the...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -