Business is booming.

Abbreviated pundit roundup: The power of the vote, soon in a neighborhood near you

In addition to the excellent daily coverage here from Markos and Mark Sumner, this short summary of Maria Drutska will update you on what is happening in Ukraine with the collapse of Russia in Kharkiv Oblast:

Brief summary:

From mid-July to late August, Ukraine systematically targeted Russian supply lines around Kherson, Kharkov, Crimea, Donbas and other areas. The HIMARS 80 km range and other covert weapons enabled clinical attacks. The AFU warned of an imminent counter-offensive against Kherson

6th sequel: OSINT & commentators started talking about a small town called Kupiansk, which was the key to Russia’s supply lines for Izyum, a town they’ve occupied for months. Russians began to realize how far they were, and became desperate to get reinforcements

By the 7th, it was confirmed that Balakliia was near Ukraine, huge advances in and around Kherson, and it was clear that the Russians had no way of fortifying themselves. Stories of more than 1000 POWs, 600+ KIA’s came out. Meanwhile, AFU opened 2 axes to Kupiyansk. to take

By the 8th, reports of further progress had appeared on all fronts, and the AFU had been rumored to have captured Kupiyansk, although unconfirmed.

Russians lost another 650+ KIA and serious panic started to spread. Videos surfaced of Russian reinforcements, but they were fake.

And then see:

In the meantime:

Politics:

‘The environment is upside down’: why dems are winning the culture wars

Changes in public opinion may have reversed the political landscape before the culture wars.

It is already the consensus that abortion in November will be a good thing for Democrats.

What’s only now becoming clear — as Republicans scrub their campaign websites from past stances on abortion and labor to returning the focus of midterms to President Joe Biden and the economy – is how much the issue is changing the GOP’s standard playbook.

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Black swan is defined as an unpredictable or unforeseen event, usually one with extreme consequences.

LA Times:

“Something has gone terribly wrong.” How did so many of America’s secrets end up in Mar-a-Lago?

“Something terribly failed… at the Trump White House that he walked away with all these documents without anyone raising the alarm before he left,” said Larry Pfeiffer, a former high-ranking CIA officer in the George W. administration. Bush and former senior director of the White House Situation Room in the Obama administration.

The process of getting records back for safekeeping when a president leaves office has been tightened for decades. Power rests in the hands of the White House staff secretary, who must ensure that the president has the information he needs to be prepared for every conversation and decision he has to make every day — and with the responsibility to get the data back.

“What people may not realize is how well-organized this process has become,” said Deputy Sean Patrick Maloney (DN.Y.), who served as staff secretary during the final months of President Clinton’s second term.

What failed terribly is that people voluntarily voted for Trump, even knowing who he was and is.

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David Rothkopf/Daily Beast:

We need to know Trump’s motive for taking classified documents

[Marco] Rubio, as vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, should know better than to willingly transform himself into a political parrot who shows so little respect for the vital interests of the United States. The documents found in Mar-a-Lago are highly classified because they would cause serious damage to our country – and possibly to those working on our behalf – if they fell into the wrong hands. Storing them in Trump’s desk, or a closet in a country club that is already known to be a favorite stopping point for foreign spies certainly increases the chances that this could have happened.

Not to mention the damage that could have happened if Trump — or anyone with access to the documents — shared them with the wrong people.

Therefore, it is vital that, contrary to the impulses of Judge Aileen Cannon, the last-minute-appointed Trump whose ruling that the investigation should be suspended pending the appointment and review of a special captain is not just a misnomer. is from a legal perspective as experts have arguedit is also very dangerous.

To be fair, I expect Trump to assert the spy privilege on those documents.

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Max Boot/WaPo:

Putin loses his ‘choice war’ in Ukraine

Putin has tried to use the threat of Russian energy restrictions to convince Europe to stop supporting Ukraine. A Kremlin spokesperson has just announced that Russia would shut down the Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipeline to Europe until Western sanctions are lifted. But the Europeans did not hesitate. Rather, they have stepped up their efforts to end reliance on Russian energy. European gas storage facilities are almost 80 percent already filled, well before the November deadline, and the European Union is importing liquefied natural gasdelaying plans to close nuclear power plantsand reduce energy consumption.

Western sanctions have not led to an economic implosion in Russia or forced Putin to abandon his invasion, but they are taking a toll that will only increase. Russia will have a hard time running its production lines, military and civilian, without Western semiconductors — and it has a 90 percent decline in chip imports. According to BloombergAn internal Russian government document warns of a much “longer and deeper recession” than officials admit in “their optimistic public statements,” with the economy not returning to pre-war levels until “the end of the decade or later.”

Ruby Cramer/WaPo:

When a man with a gun shows up in front of a congressman’s house

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) recounts the night a gunman yelled at her and her husband outside their Seattle home—and how threats of political violence haunt and change the lives of elected officials.

“I am a freedom-loving unregistered libertarian who votes in every election, no matter how big or small,” the man wrote in his email.

“You, Pramila, are an anti-American s-pit-creating Marxist.”

“We are incompatible.”

The primary is Tuesday.

Texas Tribune-ProPublica:

91 Texas State troopers responded to the Uvalde massacre. Their bosses have averted criticism and blame.

The state police are tasked with helping all 254 Texas counties respond to emergencies such as mass shootings, but it’s especially important in rural communities where smaller police departments lack the training and experience of larger metropolitan law enforcement agencies, experts say. Such was the case in Uvalde, where the 91 state agency officers on the ground shadowed the five school district officers, the 25 emergency services of the city police and the 16 county sheriffs.

State police have been “totally opaque in pointing out their own flaws and shortcomings,” said Charles A. McClelland, who served as Houston police chief for six years before retiring in 2016. “I don’t know how the public, even in the state of Texas, would trust the DPS leadership after this.”

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