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NOAA predicts up to 20 named Atlantic storms after last year's caused $70 billion in damages

The East Coast could face a difficult time in the coming months, with more violent-than-normal hurricane activity forecasted.

Between 14 and 20 storms strong enough to be named by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) are expected in 2022, up to 10 of which are classified as hurricanes. Mentioned storms have winds over 39 mph and hurricanes have winds over 74 mph.

So far, three storms have been given name status: Hurricane Bonnie and Tropical Storms Alex and Colin. Although the NHC defines the Atlantic hurricane season as a season between June 1 and November 30, major hurricane activity usually doesn’t begin until August.

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Between 14 and 20 storms strong enough to be named by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) are expected in 2022, with up to 10 classified as hurricanes — as pictured above in the NOAA image.

Between 14 and 20 storms strong enough to be named by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) are expected in 2022, with up to 10 classified as hurricanes — as pictured above in the NOAA image.

This year, three storms have risen to name status so far: Hurricane Bonnie and Tropical Storms Alex and Colin.  Hurricane Zeta is pictured above in the Gulf of Mexico in 2020

This year, three storms have risen to name status so far: Hurricane Bonnie and Tropical Storms Alex and Colin.  Hurricane Zeta is pictured above in the Gulf of Mexico in 2020

This year, three storms have risen to name status so far: Hurricane Bonnie and Tropical Storms Alex and Colin. Hurricane Zeta is pictured above in the Gulf of Mexico in 2020

In August 2021, Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana with winds of up to 240 miles per hour, damaging thousands of homes and cutting power to millions.  Pictured above is NOAA's forecast for the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season

In August 2021, Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana with winds of up to 240 miles per hour, damaging thousands of homes and cutting power to millions.  Pictured above is NOAA's forecast for the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season

In August 2021, Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana with winds of up to 240 miles per hour, damaging thousands of homes and cutting power to millions. Pictured above is NOAA’s forecast for the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season

“While the hurricane season has started relatively slowly and no major storms have developed in the Atlantic, this is not uncommon and therefore we cannot afford to relax our vigilance,” she said in a statement. “This is especially important as we enter peak hurricane season — the next Ida or Sandy could still be lurking.”

In recent years, there has been a significant increase in hurricanes over the Atlantic. Last year was the third busiest on record, with 21 storms strong enough to be named, including seven hurricanes.

It was the first time there had been enough storms to run through the entire alphabet for two years in a row (the annual list of names does not include names beginning with the letters Q, U, X, Y, or Z). That’s a remarkable increase from the period between 1991 and 2020, when there were an average of 14 named storms per year.

In August 2021, Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana with winds of up to 240 miles per hour, damaging thousands of homes and cutting power to millions. According to government statistics, Ida killed 96 people and caused $75 billion in damage, making it the costliest U.S. natural disaster of the year.

1659725255 420 NOAA predicts up to 20 named Atlantic storms after last

1659725255 420 NOAA predicts up to 20 named Atlantic storms after last

“Municipalities and families must now prepare for the rest of what is still expected to be an active hurricane season,” Ken Graham, director of the National Weather Service, said in a statement. Last year there were 21 named storms (as seen above)

Shirley Andrus looks inside her vehicle that was crushed by a fallen tree as Hurricane Laura passed through the area on August 28, 2020 in Lake Charles, Louisiana

Shirley Andrus looks inside her vehicle that was crushed by a fallen tree as Hurricane Laura passed through the area on August 28, 2020 in Lake Charles, Louisiana

Shirley Andrus looks inside her vehicle that was crushed by a fallen tree as Hurricane Laura passed through the area on August 28, 2020 in Lake Charles, Louisiana

Officials have warned anyone living near the coast should be prepared for the possibility of severe storms.  Pictured above: Huge flooding from Hurricane Eta and Hurricane Iota in Honduras

Officials have warned anyone living near the coast should be prepared for the possibility of severe storms.  Pictured above: Huge flooding from Hurricane Eta and Hurricane Iota in Honduras

Officials have warned anyone living near the coast should be prepared for the possibility of severe storms. Pictured above: Huge flooding from Hurricane Eta and Hurricane Iota in Honduras

“Municipalities and families must now prepare for the rest of what is still expected to be an active hurricane season,” Ken Graham, director of the National Weather Service, said in a statement. pronunciation.

“Be ready to take action if a hurricane threatens your area by developing an evacuation plan now and collecting hurricane supplies before a storm hits your community.”

While the NHC forecasts don’t predict possible landfalls, Matthew Rosencrans, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s seasonal forecaster, told DailyMail.com that in above-normal years, the United States typically sees a doubling of the number of hurricanes reaching the coast from Miami to Maine.

FEMA administrator Deanne Criswell warned those living along the coast should prepare for what could come.

Just 20 minutes of prep can make a huge difference when a major storm rages toward the coast, Rosencrans noted.

“They need to make sure they have a quick, ready-to-go box with all their really important documents. They should make sure their insurance plan is up to date and discuss their plan with their family and loved ones,” he said.

This year, the United States could see a doubling in the number of hurricanes hitting the coast from Miami to Maine.  This satellite image shows Tropical Storm Dorian hovering over the Bahamas

This year, the United States could see a doubling in the number of hurricanes hitting the coast from Miami to Maine.  This satellite image shows Tropical Storm Dorian hovering over the Bahamas

This year, the United States could see a doubling in the number of hurricanes hitting the coast from Miami to Maine. This satellite image shows Tropical Storm Dorian hovering over the Bahamas

Just 20 minutes of preparation can make a huge difference when a major storm hits the coast, officials note.  Pictured: A truck is stuck on a flooded road after passing Hurricane Laura in Grand Lake south of Lake Charles, Louisiana

Just 20 minutes of preparation can make a huge difference when a major storm hits the coast, officials note.  Pictured: A truck is stuck on a flooded road after passing Hurricane Laura in Grand Lake south of Lake Charles, Louisiana

Just 20 minutes of preparation can make a huge difference when a major storm hits the coast, officials note. Pictured: A truck is stuck on a flooded road after passing Hurricane Laura in Grand Lake south of Lake Charles, Louisiana

The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center estimates the probability of “above normal” storm activity at 60 percent, which is a slight improvement from May, where the same forecasters put the probability of an above-normal season at 65 percent.

While storm activity has been relatively calm so far, those living on the East Coast should not be lulled into a false sense of security.

“I think we often feel in early August that it’s been relatively calm, even though hurricane season started on June 1, but a majority of storms really come in the next two months,” Kevin Reed, an associate dean at Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences told DailyMail.com.

“I like to put it in a different context, which is, it only takes one storm to make landfall in a particular area for a season to really make an impression.”

While climate systems are incredibly complex and influenced by numerous factors, Reed said the effects of climate change are being felt in the extreme strength of storms seen in recent years.

“The global average temperature has risen by more than a degree Celsius, the temperature in the North Atlantic is warmer than in a world without climate change,” he said.

“Therefore, if the storms do happen, and there are going to be storms in the coming months, they’re probably going to be stronger, they’re going to be pouring more rain than they would have, and those could have real consequences when they make landfall.”

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