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57k clips of dangerous driving caught on dashcam sent to police portal

Road users use their dashcams and helmet cameras with a staggering number of clips sent to a police database to report other motorists for serious traffic violations.

A total of 57,000 cases have been filed with the police since a special portal was established in July 2018, allowing the public to report dangerous and careless driving on the road, supplemented by video evidence.

Nextbase, which originally founded the National Dash Cam Safety Portal (NDCSP) four years ago, says 70 percent of these cases have resulted in some form of punishment — and the database has saved nearly half a million hours of time for officers to collect evidence. to collect and collect supporting eyewitness statements.

Shopped by other road users: Some 57,000 cases of serious traffic violations have been reported to the police by motorists via an online database leading directly to the police

The numbers were released on National Dash Cam Day – one of the lesser known annual events on the calendar.

Nextbase, one of the largest dashcam brands on the market, has used it to celebrate the huge success of its portal that allows people to buy other road users from authorities if they record violations on their devices.

All but three British troops now use the database, which allows the public to provide evidence that the police can use to prosecute offenders.

The database has a simple upload system that allows users to submit their videos, along with a short description of the recorded event, additional photos and a supporting online questionnaire, which takes about 15 minutes in total.

This can be used as an eyewitness statement if the police proceed to punish a driver caught on camera, meaning officers don’t have to spend time collecting evidence.

All publicly generated video footage can be used to address a variety of offenses including dangerous driving, driving without due care and attention, breaking solid white lines, cell phone use, improper vehicle control and violating red traffic lights.

All but three British troops now use the portal, which allows the public to upload evidence captured on their dashcams, which police can then use to prosecute offenders

All but three British troops now use the portal, which allows the public to upload evidence captured on their dashcams, which police can then use to prosecute offenders

According to the latest update from Nextbase, more than 57,000 cases of ‘serious traffic violations’ have been filed by the public since July 2018, with seven in 10 resulting in penalties of varying severity – from warning letters to fines, lawsuits and driving bans.

By not having to search for witness statements itself, the portal has saved an estimated 458,000 hours of police time – or 52 full years.

“The police aren’t just behind these videos, they’re using them,” explains Bryn Brooker, head of traffic safety at Nextbase.

“Almost all troops in the country are now signed up, and the remaining handful plan to do so soon.

“The system we built four years ago not only helps the police, it also gets dangerous drivers off the road.”

The dashcam maker says many more cases of serious traffic violations could be punished if more drivers use the database.

A survey of more than 2,000 British drivers found that they see an average of 14 illegal driving violations each week.

These are usually speeding, with two-thirds (67 percent) of the motorists surveyed saying they see this on a weekly basis, followed by failing to report (60 percent), tailgating (52 percent) and dangerous overtaking (52 percent). cents).

Motorists witness an average of 14 serious traffic violations per week, although 75% of those surveyed said they never reported them.  Increased use of dashcams could see this change in years to come

Motorists witness an average of 14 serious traffic violations per week, although 75% of those surveyed said they never reported them. Increased use of dashcams could see this change in years to come

Despite this, three quarters (75 percent) say they have never reported a traffic incident before, let alone used the online portal.

Of the quarter of drivers who reported other drivers to the police through traditional methods, the majority said the process was “complicated”.

Overall, two in five (41 percent) of drivers surveyed said they had failed to report a serious traffic violation because they didn’t know how.

With dashcams becoming more popular and some insurers offering to cut premiums if drivers use one, there will likely be an increase in the number of dangerous driving cases reported to the police each year.

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