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NASA is 'in the final stretch' of launching its Artemis I mission on August 29

NASA is “in the final stages” of launching its Artemis I mission as it will roll the world’s most powerful rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), and the Orion capsule to the launch pad in just two weeks.

NASA administrator Bill Nelson said at a briefing on Wednesday, “This is the Artemis generation now,” Nelson said. ‘

“We were in the Apollo generation, but this is a new generation, this is a new type of astronaut. And for all of us staring at the moon, dreaming of the day humanity returns to the lunar surface, folks, we’re here. We go back and that journey, our journey, begins with Artemis I.”

The US space agency held the press conference to discuss what the world will see when the mission begins at 8:33 a.m. ET on August 29.

The SLS and Orion crew pod will sit high on Launch complex 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, where at least 100,000 people could gather along the coast to see the historic first flight.

The 32-story rocket will generate 8.8 million pounds of thrust when lifted, allowing it to climb to the atmosphere before separating from the Orion craft eight minutes later.

Orion will then begin its journey to the moon, with the closest point being just 100 kilometers from the lunar surface and 58,000 kilometers past the far side of the moon at its farthest point.

The months-long mission is more of a test bed to ensure that both the rocket and capsule are able and safe to carry the first woman and person of color to the moon in 2025, all of which is a stepping stone toward landing the first. people on Mars.

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NASA will roll out the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion capsule to the launch pad in just two weeks as it plans to launch its Artemis I mission on August 29.

“We’re going to Mars and we’re going back to the moon, to work, live and survive,” Nelson said.

‘[We’re going to] learn to use the resources on the moon to build things in the future.’

Artemis I will be unmanned and will instead carry three mannequins dressed in flight suits.

And one was named Commander Moonikin Campos when it was most popular in a public inquiry.

Artemis I will be detached and instead wear three mannequins dressed in flight suits

Artemis I will be detached and instead wear three mannequins dressed in flight suits

And one was named Commander Moonikin Campos when it was most popular in a public inquiry.

And one was named Commander Moonikin Campos when it was most popular in a public inquiry.

The mannequins will help NASA obtain data on what crew members would experience during the flight.

The mission will also allow NASA to see how resilient the spacecraft’s heat shield is against real-world elements, as the technology has only been tested in an Earth-based simulation.

“We’re going to really push this test flight, emphasize it more than we would with a crew on board,” Nelson said.

‘We didn’t have that luxury on the space shuttle, because you had to have crew on board, but they had already tested a number of elements, such as those silicone tiles on the space shuttle.

“This is an ablative heat shield and the only way you can test it is to take it outside and let it in at 32 Mach.”

“Everything has to work perfectly,” Sarafin said. ‘We are going into deep space, an environment with a lot of radiation. We will experience what it is like for our astronauts to fly in subsequent missions under those conditions.’

are able and safe to transport the first woman and person of color to the moon in 2025, all of which is a stepping stone towards placing the first humans on Mars

are able and safe to transport the first woman and person of color to the moon in 2025, all of which is a stepping stone towards placing the first humans on Mars

Another briefing will take place Friday at 11:30 a.m. ET, which will focus on the Artemis I mission hardware, development mockups, design simulators, flight control operations, and hardware under development for lunar exploration.

NASA also announced Wednesday that it plans to send Apollo 11 relics along for the ride to the moon, including a bolt, nut and washer from one of the ship’s engines, as well as a small moon rock collected by astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz. aldrin .

NASA will land the first woman and first person of color on the moon in 2025 as part of the Artemis mission

Artemis was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the moon in Greek mythology.

NASA has chosen her to personify the path back to the moon, which will see astronauts return to the lunar surface by 2025 — including the first woman and the next man.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.

Artemis 1 will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Artemis 1 will be an unmanned flight that will provide a foundation for human exploration of deep space and demonstrate our commitment and capacity to extend human existence to the moon and beyond.

During this flight, the spacecraft will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown.

It will travel 280,000 miles (450,600 km) from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of a mission lasting about three weeks.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.  This image explains the different stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. This image explains the different stages of the mission

Orion will stay in space longer than any other astronaut ship has done without docking in a space station and returning home faster and hotter than ever before.

With this first exploration mission, NASA is leading the next steps of human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and test the near-moon systems needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations further from Earth, including Mars.

They take the crew on a different trajectory and test Orion’s critical systems with people on board.

Together, Orion, SLS and the ground systems at Kennedy will be able to meet the most challenging needs of crew and cargo missions in deep space.

Ultimately, NASA aims to establish a sustainable human presence on the moon by 2028 as a result of the Artemis mission.

The space agency hopes this colony will discover new scientific discoveries, demonstrate new technological advances and lay the foundation for private companies to build a lunar economy.

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